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Morgenstern
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« on: November 09, 2012, 04:41:13 AM »

BIG DAMN HEROES

   The premise is simple: Player characters don’t die. The party is the centerpiece of the story, the persistent window through which players see and affect the GMs setting. They get top billing in the flashy opening and they pretty much always stick around until the credits roll.
   They also get their asses kicked occasionally just to show why real victories are so sweet.

Here’s the Deal
   The execution of this social contract is a bit more complex than ‘do whatever you want, because you’re safe from all harm’. The Game Master promises not to kill the player characters, but he won’t stop them from killing themselves. Situations prompted by the GM can lead to a character’s defeat, but never death. If a sudden wind or slap of a wyverns tail sends a player off the side of a dizzyingly high and narrow mountainside trail, that character always end up hanging from the ledge by their fingertips or snagged in the branches of a lonely tree part way down - perhaps defeated and out of play, but still alive. Players still have the power to commit suicide - if the player chooses to jump off into that chasm, he’s done. Whenever a player announces their intention to take an action that will categorically result in their death, the GM must spell out in no uncertain terms that’s a ‘fatal decision’. After that its on the player’s head. The GM has a fair bit of latitude in determining what constitutes a fatal decision - maybe more than players are used to. If he says “going into the dragon’s cave armed and skilled as you are now is certain death” he’s not kidding. If players choose to go anyway, that’s the end of them - no combat scene required, just a few gouts of flame, some screaming, and off to roll up new characters. There is a subtle but critical distinction between saying that and saying “going into the dragon’s cave armed and skilled as you are now is almost certain doom.” That’s the signpost that you can go, but don’t look shocked if you wind up getting pounded, and pounded badly. The safety net is to keep players from getting killed, not to prevent them from running headlong into the wrong end of a level-inappropriate encounter.
   Not sure if your GM is telling you you're about to make a fatal decision? Ask them. Its not a trick question. It's the GMs responsiblity to make the the prospect of fatal decisions clear moreso than to entertain by couching them in flowery language.

Health and Morale
   The distance between you and your defeat is measured in Health and Morale. Health is your actual physical condition - it is based on your Fitness score adjusted by your size category. It represents the last reserves you can fall back on as things go badly for you. It creates a small window were you gain the strength of desperation before either triumphing over adversity or falling into defeat. Once lost, points of Health are exceedingly difficult to recover. Morale is your primary damage buffer, allowing you to face all manner of both physical and emotional threats while pressing on in heroic fashion. Player characters gain morale from their class levels adjusted by their Determination modifier. Outside of immediate peril (combat or dangerous environments) morale recovers rapidly. However, many effects can temporarily reduce you maximum morale, making you progressively more vulnerable to sudden defeat.
   Unlike traditional Mastercraft, standard NPCs have morale rather than making damage saves, receiving a number of points equal to their morale grade × times the threat level of the scene. Standard NPC are defeated by any critical hit (unless they are able to absorb some number of critical hits via grades of the Tough quality). While they have Health scores, in practice it’s unnecessary to track their Health if they do not have grades of Tough (see taking damage, below). Mooks are still defeated by a single successful attack.

Taking Damage
   All three types of damage – lethal, stress, and subdual – are subtracted from the target’s current morale. If this damage removes the character’s last point of morale, the attack gains the additional effects of a critical hit and any remaining damage is applied to the target’s Health. when a target’s Health is reduced to 0, they are defeated.
   When a character scores a threat, roll the attack check again. If the second check is also a threat or the attacker spends an action die, the attack is confirmed as a critical hit with the following additional affects.

•   Defeat (all damage types): If the target is a standard character, they are immediately defeated. The attacker may choose to kill the target as part of this defeat. The GM may spend 4 action dice to kill the defeated character regardless of the attacker’s intentions.
•   Lethal Critical: The damage inflicted increases by your Fitness score on melee/unarmed attacks or Precision score on ranged attacks. If you substituted a different attribute modifier when making this attack check, you may use that attribute score instead. If the target has any action dice remaining they are also wounded.
•   Stress Critical: The target is flat-footed and remains so until they take an action, even if they are attacked multiple times before then. If the target has any action dice remaining they are also shaken.
•   Subdual Critical: The target is sprawled. If the target has any action dice remaining they are also fatigued.

Behind the Curtain: Wait a second, when I don't have action dice?
   Many rules and character options in the New Pie focus on rewarding players for spending their action dice rather than hoarding them. In the case of critical hits in combat, rather than creating a situation where opponents trade dice to confirm crits/cancel crits, the defender simply escapes the stacking condition penalty by showing he's already playing as hard as he can, having spent through his entire pool of dice.
   This does raise the question of 'when do NPCs have no dice?' NPCs under the players' control, such and Personal Lieutenants, have dice if their controling player has dice. NPCs who are the player's allies are always considered to be out of dice. Neutral NPCs have dice or not at the GMs discretion. Hostile NPCs including all adversaries have dice if the GM still has action dice remaining.

Desperation
   Special characters don’t like to give up. The first time a special character is reduced to 0 morale after the start of a scene or after rallying, he becomes desperate. When a charater becomes desperate they gain 1 bonus action die or 2 bonus dice if it is a dramatic scene. These dice are discarded at the end of the current scene. While desperate the character gains any bonuses he's entitled to as if this were a dramatic scene (i.e. the heroism Origin benefit) if it is not already a dramatic scene. Becoming desperate and being desperate may also act as triggers for other character options (i.e. the Too Pretty to Die feat, see below). The character ceases to be desperate as soon as he has regained his maxiumum morale points or morale points greater than his Determination score, whichever is lower.

Defeated, not Dead?
   So what is defeat (the game term), and why is it maybe worse than death? Defeated is a condition that takes the place of death for most negative outcomes - when you reach 0 Health you are defeated. For standard NPCs its a catch all for beaten into submission or possibly dead, depending on the attacker’s mood. For Special NPCs its beaten badly enough they can no longer press the fight. For Player characters its the point were you are out of the story... for a while. The reason it may be worse than death is NPCs, particularly friendly NPCs, don’t share in this protection. If the entire party is defeated its a wipe and bad things happen - villains advance their schemes unopposed, critical allies get killed, current party goals may be come unachievable, and best (or worst) of all the players have to live with the consequences. Them’s the breaks of immortality.

Rallying
   After being defeated, players can return to active play three ways.

•   Battlefield Rally: Spells or character abilities may offer a battlefield rally. This returns the character to play immediately. The amount of health and morale restored is described with each option. Batlefield rallies frequently reduce the rallied character’s maximum morale until the end of the scene.
•   Regroup: Once all non-defeated members of the player party are out of combat and any dangerous environments they may rally the other players and any surviving NPCs. Characters rally with their maximum morale reduced to one-half until the end of the current scene (rounded up). They recover 1d6 health and their maximum (adjusted) morale. If the party wipes, the GM may choose to allow the players to regroup in place, where they can directly experience the consequences of their defeat with play typically resuming 1 hour after any surviving hostile characters have withdrawn.
•   Fall Back!: When all of the Player characters and their allies have been defeated the party is forced to fall back. One way players can prepare for setbacks is to select a rally point by unanimous decision. Rally points fall into 3 categories: secure locations (such as a friendly town or pre-prepared safehouse), their present location if they are not directly under threat (such as the party’s current campsite), or a proposed location within 1 day’s travel for the slowest player character that is unlikely to be under direct threat. These three categories primarily affect the number of action dice the GM must spend to torment the players should they suffer a wipe and be forced to fall back. Undefeated Players may (by unanimous decision) choose to conceed a combat to the enemy, retreating to the rally point prior to a party wipe. Play resumes after a reasonable amount of time has passed to allow characters to singly or in small groups groups slink off back to the rally point. If the Players have not agreed upon a rally point prior to wiping the GM chooses one for them, with the modifiers for meddling with their rally as for proposed locations.

New Conditions

   Defeated: Standard characters may take no actions. Special character may take no actions except a 5 foot step each round if there are no opponents adjacent to them. They may speak to other characters only with the GMs aproval. This condition only ends when the character rallies. Defeated characters do not block movement through or around their space and cannot contribute to flanking. Other characters within 1 size category of the defeated character may not end their movement in the defeated character's space.

   Fatigued (I–IV + defeat): The character may not Run. Further, his Speed drops by 5 ft. and his Fitness and Precision scores each drop by 2 per grade he suffers. If a character with fatigued IV is fatigued again he is defeated. Characters lose half their fatigue grades at the end of each scene (round up). Characters also lose 1 grade of fatigue per full night’s sleep (minimum 6 uninterrupted hours).

   Shaken (I–IV + defeat): The character may not take 10 or 20. Further, he suffers a –2 penalty with all attack checks and his Awareness and Guile scores each drop by 2 per grade he suffers. If a character with shaken IV is shaken again he is defeated. Characters lose half their shaken grades at the end of each scene (round up). Characters also lose 1 grade of shaken per full night’s sleep (minimum 6 uninterrupted hours).

   Wounded (I–IV + defeat): The character may not Refresh. Further, he suffers a –1 penalty with all saves and his Determination and Grace scores each drop by 2 per grade he suffers. If a character with wounded IV is wounded again he is defeated. Characters lose half their wounded grades at the end of each scene (round up). Characters also lose 1 grade of wounded per full night’s sleep (minimum 6 uninterrupted hours).

New Actions

   Refresh (Full Initiative Action): You recover morale equal to your base Fortitude Save bonus + half your Determination score (round up). You may spend and roll exactly 1 action die and add the results to the number of morale points recovered.

New Tricks

   Go to Ground (Refresh trick): You may also make a standard move as part of this refresh action if that move ends with you in a location that grants at least 1/2 cover towards 1 or more adversaries.

   Take Stock, then Rock (Refresh trick): You may also take a use item action to ready, stow, or reload a weapon on you person during this refresh action.

New Species Feats

Cling to Life
   The will to survive is strong in this one.
   Benefit: Your maximum health increase by 5. When you become desperate you immediately lose the baffled, enraged, fixated, frightened, and/or stunned conditions.

New Style Feats

Too Pretty to Die
   Hey now, he's the one with the great hulking bloodsoaked axe... Shouldn't you be looking at him?
   Prerequisites: Grace or Guile 17+
   Benefit: You may add your Grace or Guile modifier to your melee/unarmed defense as a second attribute bonus while you are within 15 ft. of a teammate with a higher Base Attack Bonus than your own. When you become desperate, each of your teammates able to see and hear you immediately recovers morale as if they had taken a refresh action.

GM Action Dice

Interfering with Rallying.

1 die: party-wide brief delays
1 die: party-wide harrowing trek (increased morale cap penalty)
1 die: party-wide minor losses (reduced prudence)
2 dice: long delays
2 dice: major losses (3 low value gear destroyed)
4 dice: crushing losses (1 high value gear destroyed)
1 die per character: injury (table of ouch)
1 die per character: the character is captured by their opponents.

   If the players have selected a secure location to rally at the total number of dice required is increased by 1. If they have selected a proposed location to rally at it is reduced by 2 (to a minimum of 1).
« Last Edit: November 09, 2012, 10:21:47 PM by Morgenstern » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2012, 04:41:40 AM »

Reserved.
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« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2012, 06:05:20 AM »

As a matter of simplicity, Desperation feels more like it should be tricks rather than a baseline rule
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« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2012, 06:48:22 AM »

As a matter of simplicity, Desperation feels more like it should be tricks rather than a baseline rule

Split the difference I think - set up a default effect and use tricks to alter or extend it. Makes for a lot simpler expansibility. I wrote that over a year ago and haven't really looked at it since. It was partially inspired by fight games where you could only access certain super movers when your life bar was nealy gone. These days playing Guild Wars 2 I've seen a lot of neat ideas around fighting out that last few hits on the health bar and in-combat rallies. Given that I could probably crib a dozen good desperation effects from that game's concepts, expansibilty is appealing.
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« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2012, 07:37:48 AM »

In that case, I'd go with Need as the baseline: it's simple and elegant, getting across the idea that you're kinda screwed  now but here's something that might help you dig your way out. Clarity's removing conditions just seems to really send the wrong message in that it effectively undoes critical hits, Retaliation is absolutely a trick verging on a full out Chance or Basic Combat feat, while Plight feels like it should be the basis for new core ability for the Captain.

I'm also tempted to think that a lethal crit should inflict bleed X, where X is the value of your starting action dice or the attribute modifer connected to the attack.
« Last Edit: November 09, 2012, 07:41:07 AM by Mister Andersen » Logged

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« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2012, 02:35:17 PM »

BIG DAMN HEROES

   The premise is simple: Player characters don’t die. The party is the centerpiece of the story, the persistent window through which players see and affect the GMs setting. They get top billing in the flashy opening and they pretty much always stick around until the credits roll. They also get their asses kicked occasionally just to show why real victories are so sweet.

Here’s the Deal
   The execution of this social contract is a bit more complex than ‘do whatever you want, because you’re safe from all harm’. The Game Master promises not to kill the player characters, but he won’t stop them from killing themselves. Situations prompted by the GM can lead to a character’s defeat, but never death. If a sudden wind or slap of a wyverns tail sends a player off the side of a dizzyingly high and narrow mountainside trail, that character always end up hanging from the ledge by their fingertips or snagged in the branches of a lonely tree part way down - perhaps defeated and out of play, but still alive. Players still have the power to commit suicide - if the player chooses to jump off into that chasm, he’s done. Whenever a player announces that they intend to take an action that will categorically result in their death, the GM must spell out in no uncertain terms that’s a ‘fatal decision’. After that its on the player’s head. The GM has a fair bit of latitude in determining what constitutes a fatal decision - maybe more than players are used to. If he says “going into the dragon’s cave armed and skilled as you are now is certain death” he’s not kidding. If players choose to go anyway, that’s the end of them. There is a subtle but critical distinction between saying that and saying “going into the dragon’s cave armed and skilled as you are now is almost certain doom.” That’s the signpost that you can go, but don’t look shocked if you wind up getting pounded, and pounded badly. Not sure if your GM is telling you you're about to make a fatal decision? Ask them. Its not a trick question.

I've been waiting to see this.  

Health and Morale
   The distance between you and your defeat is measured in Health and Morale. Health is your actual physical condition - it is based on your Fitness score adjusted by your size category. It represents the last reserves you can fall back on as things go badly for you. It creates a small window were you gain the strength of desperation before either triumphing over adversity or falling into defeat. Once lost, points of Health are exceedingly difficult to recover. Morale is your primary damage buffer, allowing you to face all manner of both physical and emotional threats while pressing on in heroic fashion. Player characters gain morale from their class levels adjusted by their Determination modifier. Outside of immediate peril (combat or dangerous environments) morale recovers rapidly. However, many effects can temporarily reduce you maximum morale, making you progressively more vulnerable to sudden defeat.
   Unlike traditional Mastercraft, standard NPCs have morale rather than making damage saves, receiving a number of points equal to their morale grade × times the threat level of the scene. Standard NPC are defeated by any critical hit (unless they are able to absorb some number of critical hits via grades of the Tough quality). While they have Health scores, in practice it’s unnecessary to track their Health if they do not have grades of Tough (see taking damage, below). Mook NPCs are still defeated by a single successful attack.

I'd love to hear the reasoning behind giving Standards morale.  I've figured out 50% fail rates in the past so that I could avoid tracking damage on standards.

Taking Damage
   All three types of damage – lethal, stress, and subdual – are subtracted from the target’s current morale. If this damage removes the character’s last point of morale, the attack gains the additional effects of a critical hit of that specific damage type and any remaining damage is applied to the target’s Health. when a target’s Health is reduced to 0, they are defeated.
   When a character scores a threat, roll the attack check again. If the second check is also a threat or the attacker spends an action die, the attack is confirmed as a critical hit with the following additional affects.

•   Defeat (all damage types): If the target is a standard character, they are immediately defeated. The attacker may choose to kill the target as part of this defeat. The GM may spend 4 action dice to kill the defeated character regardless of the attacker’s intentions.
•   Lethal Critical: The target also suffers 1d6 damage directly to their Health. The target may spend 2 action dice to avoid this additional damage.

Isn't this going to suffer from the same problems you outlined yesterday anytime you get less than complete buy-in?  And while I like having a direct to health route, Mr A's suggestion of bleeding would be perfect here.  Even better if bleeding was graded.  (How much am I bleeding?  Let's see Bleeding III says fountains)

•   Stress Critical: The Target is also shaken. The target may spend 2 action dice to avoid this condition.
•   Subdual Critical: The Target is also fatigued. The target may spend 2 action dice to avoid this condition.

Desperation
   Special characters don’t like to give up. The first time a special character is reduced to 0 morale after the start of a scene or after rallying, he may choose one of the following benefits.

I'm not seeing the advantage of making these tricks.  There's no base action to apply to.  On another note, the Explorer's game breaker is a Desperation Benefit.  or would make a great one.

•   Desperate Clarity: You may immediately remove any combination of 3 of the following conditions: baffled, enraged, fixated, fatigued, and/or stunned. Conditions with multiple grades can be chosen multiple times.
•   Desperate Need: You gain 2 bonus action dice. These dice are discarded at the end of the current scene.
•   Desperate Plight: Your circumstances encourage your teammates to greater effort. Each of your teammates able to see and hear you when you gain this benefit immediately recovers morale as if they had taken a refresh action.
•   Desperate Retaliation: If the actions of another character reduced your morale to 0, you gain a +5 bonus to all attack checks against that character until they are defeated, you have recovered at least half of your vitality, or the scene ends whichever comes first.

Defeated, not Dead?
   So what is defeat (the game term), and why is it maybe worse than death? Defeated is a condition that takes the place of death for most negative outcomes - when you reach 0 Health you are defeated. For standard NPCs its a catch all for beaten into submission or possibly dead, depending on the attacker’s mood. For Special NPCs its beaten badly enough they can no longer press the fight. For Player characters its the point were you are out of the story... for a while. The reason it may be worse than death is NPCs, particularly friendly NPCs, don’t share in this protection. If the entire party is defeated its a wipe and bad things happen - villains advance their schemes unopposed, critical allies get killed, current party goals may be come unachievable, and best (or worst of all) the players have to live with the consequences. Them’s the breaks of immortality.

I like this.

Rallying
   After being defeated, players can return to active play three ways.

•   Battlefield Rally: Spells or character abilities may offer a battlefield rally. This returns the character to play immediately. The amount of health and morale restored is described with each option. Batlefield rallies frequently reduce the rallied character’s maximum morale until the end of the scene.
•   Regroup: Once all non-defeated members of the player party are out of combat and any dangerous environments they may rally the other players and any surviving NPCs. Characters rally with their maximum morale reduced to one-half until the end of the current scene (rounded up). They recover 1d6 health and their maximum (adjusted) morale. This option is not typically available in the event of a party wipe.
•   Fall Back!: When all of the Player characters and their allies have been defeated the party is forced to fall back. One way players can prepare for setbacks is to select a rally point. Rally points fall into 3 categories: secure locations (such as a friendly town or pre-prepared safehouse), their present location if they are not directly under threat (such as the party’s current campsite), or a proposed location within 1 day’s travel for the slowest player character that is unlikely to be under direct threat. These three categories primarily affect the number of action dice the GM must spend to torment the players should they suffer a wipe and be forced to fall back. Play resumes after a reasonable amount of time has passed to allow characters to singly or in groups slink off back to the rally point. If the Players have not set a rally point the GM chooses one for them, with the modifiers for meddling with their recovers as for proposed locations.

You need another one: In the Aftermath: The players wake up in the point of defeat and among the carnage caused by their defeat.  Good when the point is to defend innocents.

Also you may want to provide defeat options like retreat or hide in terror Smiley

New Conditions

   Defeated: Standard characters may take no actions. Special character may take a 5 foot step each round if there are no opponents adjacent to them. This condition ends when the character rallies or the scene ends. Defeated characters do not block movement through or around their space and cannot contribute to flanking.
I assume that should read "Special characters may take no action except..."
« Last Edit: November 09, 2012, 03:14:10 PM by Blankbeard » Logged
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« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2012, 02:47:44 PM »

Gold as usual, Scott. Nicely done.  Smiley
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« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2012, 06:04:32 PM »

I'm not seeing the advantage of making these tricks.  There's no base action to apply to.

Initiative action in response to being reduced to 0 morale
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« Reply #8 on: November 09, 2012, 06:57:49 PM »

I'm not seeing the advantage of making these tricks.  There's no base action to apply to.

Initiative action in response to being reduced to 0 morale

Its state based, so folding adjustments into feats is the ussual procedure. I shied away from that because it would take longer to create examples, but I've got two examples in the text now so better to do it right. Also added what I think is a fun little twist for being desperate Smiley.
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« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2012, 09:15:11 PM »

I've been waiting to see this.

In my head it hasn't changed much since I first put it out there a year ago. But its a lot easier for other people to see formal text than to look inside my head I guess Smiley.

Quote
I'd love to hear the reasoning behind giving Standards morale.  I've figured out 50% fail rates in the past so that I could avoid tracking damage on standards.

In some ways you answered your own question: as it stands now the bookkeeping to track damage and make NPC damage saves is more trouble than it's worth (to me). In my case I came down on the side of using a single standardized damage tracking system for Special characters and standard characters. Keeping a scratch sheet for NPC damage is second nature after 25 years, and I'm going back to it Smiley. It also TREMENDOUSLY simplifies the language for healing effects and since a major underlying goal of the entire New Pie project is to establish the ground rules for any new mechanics I want to write in support of the Skies of Pah'Senna or Farthest Star, simplified rules text for healing is very appealing to me.

Your 50/50 mooks (mentally tagged as "flunkies") are almost certainly going to get co-opted as a new NPC quality. I like mooks (no book keeping at all) and Schrodinger Mooks make me laugh enough to give them a try.

The knife cut both ways though - It was the single total trackign of stress, subdual, and lethal damage for standard Mastercraft NPCs that made me really look at single damage tracks for the Players too.

Quote
Isn't this going to suffer from the same problems you outlined yesterday anytime you get less than complete buy-in?  And while I like having a direct to health route, Mr A's suggestion of bleeding would be perfect here.  Even better if bleeding was graded.  (How much am I bleeding?  Let's see Bleeding III says fountains)

Updated with symetrical grades o' doom for all. I'll get to bleeding grades shortly, as there some seriously nasty damage over time effect mechanics I've worked out that I want to roll out all in one place. Buckets o' blood indeed Smiley.

Quote
I'm not seeing the advantage of making these tricks.  There's no base action to apply to.  On another note, the Explorer's game breaker is a Desperation Benefit.  or would make a great one.

Standardized Desperation effect + feats. And hoo-boy is the raiding of 4th ed D&D gonna be fun with this tech in place Smiley.

Quote
You need another one: In the Aftermath: The players wake up in the point of defeat and among the carnage caused by their defeat.  Good when the point is to defend innocents.

Also you may want to provide defeat options like retreat or hide in terror Smiley

Folded into existing rallies. Good call for dramatic license though Smiley.

Quote
I assume that should read "Special characters may take no action except..."

Good catch. Fixed in text.
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« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2012, 09:37:21 PM »

Hmmm. What about making desperate a condition, which would then allow you to utilise it via other character options than just removing morale?

Wounded is interesting and very New Pie -- I think however I still prefer the visceralness of bleed as the lethal crit effect --  though I'd key it to Determination & Fitness, and Grace & Precision for fatigued.

Speaking of, any thought of changing fatigued from flatout preventing running to each grade eating away at your run multplier? -- unarmoured, an ordinary person is running at 3x speed @ fatigued I, 2x @ II and then can't run at III. Or alternatively ignore run and simply have each grade knock 5 ft off your movement modes, which also affects your running & jumping distances, which would better model the condition of losing your energy
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« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2012, 09:49:28 PM »

Hmmm. What about making desperate a condition, which would then allow you to utilise it via other character options than just removing morale?

Its a state, so it's already effectively a condition. However my experience with the various Spycraft editions is that condition bloat makes that section reach a page count that causes people's eyes to glaze over. In this case I'm happier to keep the whole thing confined to a single paragraph placed in line with the steps of taking damage where it's most pertinent. That compartmentalization also benefits folks who want to cherry pick ideas from the pie without eating the whole thing, ice cream topping and all Smiley.

Quote
Wounded is interesting and very New Pie -- I think however I still prefer the visceralness of bleed as the lethal crit effect --  though I'd key it to Determination & Fitness, and Grace & Precision for fatigued.


Where as I want a general rule "5 crits and you're done" that is consistent across damage types. Besides - spending an action die to tack on somewhere around +15 points of damage is going to send them to the table of ouch and set them to bleeding in a lot of cases already...

I promise I'm gonna make bleed extraordinaily nasty/visceral Smiley... But not at this step.

Quote
Speaking of, any thought of changing fatigued from flatout preventing running to each grade eating away at your run multplier?

Nope. I really liked the symetry of Wounded and Fatigued both flatly prohibiting a type of full action. Its a little more round about, but Shaken comes quite close to doing the same thing.


One thing that hasn't been mentioned yet that I'm aware of as a smoothing and linking step still to be accomplished is that non-combat subdual and stress damage doesn't work right now (it can grind out you Health and Morale, but its not triggering condition grades along the way). I am aware and have an adaptor in mind but I'm still testing it out.
« Last Edit: November 09, 2012, 10:09:21 PM by Morgenstern » Logged

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« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2012, 08:37:40 PM »

Possible BDHized abilities:

unyielding: When you refresh, you may spend and roll up to three action dice, recovering the total in vitality.  Also, you may refresh while defeated.  When you do so successfully, you rally.

Might need a limit to keep it from being whack a martial artist.

Lifeline: Once per scene, when you would be defeated, you instead have one Health point and are flat-footed.

Maybe?
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Blankbeard
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« Reply #13 on: November 11, 2012, 10:50:59 PM »

•   Lethal Critical: The damage inflicted increases by your Fitness score on melee/unarmed attacks or Precision score on ranged attacks. If you substituted a different attribute modifier when making this attack check, you may use that attribute score instead. If the target has any action dice remaining they are also wounded.

Sorry to doublepost but I just noticed this.  Score?  This is commonly going to be 14-18 damage, in other words a one shot kill.

Bad idea?
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Mister Andersen
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« Reply #14 on: November 11, 2012, 10:56:34 PM »

You'll notice that it's not going directly to health; it's simply an increase in the damage output of the attack.
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