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Author Topic: Are you using the Mistborn rules for anything else?  (Read 1994 times)
Shinrei
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« on: January 09, 2012, 07:03:29 AM »

Hi all,

I was wondering, are you all playing the mistborn rules only with the mistborn setting or are there some of you that have taken the rules and used it for another published setting (if so, which one?) or a homebrew setting (if so, tell us about it)?

Just curious  Grin
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Aminar
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« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2012, 01:23:17 PM »

Well, honestly considering most of the rules are for the magic system and that is very much only mistborn, I doubt you'll get much.

That said, I've debated trying to make some custom versions of Brandon's other magic systems, theoretically they all exist in the Cosmere(Basically his universe.  All his books are slightly linked by that and some guy named Hoid.)  He has a pretty defined system as to how they work, at least for Elantris and Warbreaker, both of which would be fun.
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Skywalker
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« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2012, 01:49:55 PM »

Only Mistborn so far. I had an inkling of inspiration to do an Exalted conversion Cheesy

Allomancy would be the basis for Charm use, Feruchemy for Sorcery and Hemalurgy for something else.
« Last Edit: January 09, 2012, 01:53:03 PM by Skywalker » Logged
ComicJam
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« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2012, 01:51:00 PM »

Only Mistborn so far. I had an inkling of inspiration to do an Exalted conversion Cheesy

That's EXACTLY what I was planning. I think it'd work really well.

Cheers! Cheesy
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Agent 333
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« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2012, 02:59:13 PM »

I'm with Animar on thinking of other Sanderson settings to convert. I have a pretty good idea of what I want to do with Elantrians, but they're pretty over-powered (or under-powered, post Reod). Not sure that even Strong powers is enough to cover how much you can do with AonDor, and that's not even counting the side benefits. It's basically like burning Pewter constantly with half the stunts, plus runic magic on top of that...
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Maliloki
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« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2012, 03:51:16 PM »

I was thinking about trying a star wars adaptation. I think it would work pretty well.
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ZetaStriker
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« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2012, 06:57:38 PM »

I'm already using it for a Steampunk version of the Final Empire, actually. Still the Mistborn setting, but with elements of Last Exile and other Steampunk things thrown in. I outlined it in another thread already, but basically the Lord Ruler had to release technological information in order to keep Ruin from destroying Scadriel when he replaced Preservation in the mists and turned them into a deadly miasma.

The biggest additions here are the use of Vanships and Zeppelins in-game, as well as the Civil war-era weaponry. It's not a drastic conversion, but it works well enough so long as you make a few tweaks to the ranges in combat and use Beats accordingly. I just have to make sure not give the PCs free use of new technologies. They had to spend Spirit to guess how to elevate a Zeppelin for the first time, for instance, and they were unable to steer until they got a captured Obligator to teach them. Another character's first encounter with a musket led him to picking it up off a dead soldier and trying to hold up an Obligator to get his soldiers to surrender. When that failed, he pulled the trigger and . . . *click* He'd picked it up AFTER the soldier had fired, and was no awkwardly facing a dozen archers with an empty gun. That was a fun moment, as I cut to the next character's beat after the click and made him wait a round for the incoming attacks. XD
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Agent 333
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« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2012, 06:59:30 PM »

Hmm, that Star Wars idea could actually work quite well.../gears turning
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hidajiremi
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« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2012, 11:44:03 PM »

I'm actually working on using the rules for a steampunk setting. The only powers-based assumption in the core rules is that powers exist, and that there are three degrees of powers (no powers, weak/focused powers, and strong/versatile powers). With that in mind, I'm working up a steampunk setting where the power tiers are:
*Weak: No powers
*Average: Mutant or Escaped Lab Project
*Strong: Mad Scientist or Steamborg

I'll need to wait for the Alloy of Law supplement for full rules on guns, but they seem to be pretty doable now with some fudging. The only other thing that needs work is the cost for props without the assumption of "metal = more dangerous." I'm really psyched about it.
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Toloran
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« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2012, 01:28:38 AM »

I love the core of this game's system. Right now, I'm adapting it for use with Brent Weeks' "The Black Prism" series. Yay chromaturgy.
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Maliloki
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« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2012, 10:24:06 AM »

Hmm, that Star Wars idea could actually work quite well.../gears turning

If you come up with anything cool, let me know. I'm unfortunately have other priorities at the moment.
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ZetaStriker
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« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2012, 01:23:55 PM »

Oh, Brent Weeks. It seems so fitting that a Brandon Sanderson system is used for him. Mistborn and Night Angel always reminded me of each other, sans the grimdark in Night Angel, and there was obviously a Warbreaker/Black Prism parallel, as Weeks lamented in his comments at the end of the novel. I think it's funny, because all of Weeks' woes seem to come from thinking like Brandon but writing much slower. XD
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Gwathdring
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« Reply #12 on: April 14, 2012, 03:24:02 PM »

I've been mucking around with it, and I've chosen to use Mistborn instead of Fate-Based Dresden for a campy supernatural game I'll be running. In my game, the RCMP has a special branch where trouble-makers and political exiles get transfered when they can't quite be kicked off the force--the Special Observations Corps, more commonly and derisively called the "Spook Squad." Their job is to investigate strange happenings, primarily in rural Canada, encountering all sorts of UFO sightings and similar bits of fantastical calls for assistance. Naturally these competent but politically volatile officers run into actual supernatural happenings involving rogue sorcerers, werewolves, and a crash course in Canadian geography for my American players. Alternatively, I might have them arrive at the much maligned SOC to discover it is actually a top-of-the-line, in-the-know organization much like the FBI's BPRD. In either case, I intend to make it something of a Dresden/Hellboy crossover and the BRPD will make an appearance though Dresden will mostly be used to inform the supernatural backdrop and I doubt any characters will make an appearance.

Now to the system-related part. Both Dresden and Mistborn have a lot of connections (traits and burdens operate in a way somewhat like aspects, and action dice/nudges have some similarities to the Fate Economy), but I appreciate the simplicity of using attributes rather than skills. Once Aspects/Traits are established as part of the rule-set, why not allow them to define most of a character's special abilities? It is a much more intuitive way for players to build characters, I find. My non-gaming friends much prefer that style of character building to sorting and ranking skill levels.

I also love how easily Mistborn's dice-pool system can be tweaked to allow multiple actions per round. It also has my favorite initiative system to date, modeling the difference between fast thinking and fast acting. Finally, most of the narrative-centric rules I love so much in Fate are still here (zones replaced by steps, the idea of Beats and Scenes as time-flexible). I've been toying with making a variant of Fate for my game that had a slightly more elaborate Attribute system so I could distinguish the agile from the mighty, the mighty from the tough, and so forth ... I've also been considering  simply plopping all of the great GM tactics I've learned from Fate games on top of a system as lightweight and innocuous as The Window ... but I'm really excited to give a modified Mistborn system a go. I think it's a good fit, and while certainly unusual it doesn't feel crunchy at all. It's at the lovely Fate-level of crunch that gives players a lot to cling to but plenty of room to breathe, experiment, and engage with a story--be it silly or serious. I'll just need to incorporate technology and splice my modified Dresden magic into Mistborn and see if the system still gels properly. I'm expecting great things.
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Lazarus
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« Reply #13 on: April 15, 2012, 05:31:50 PM »

I've been looking for a good narrative superhero system for a while.  (If I want a crunchy superhero system, I go for Hero / Champions.)

I had been looking at the Dresden RPG, as it had the potential to have both Superman and Batman in the same group and let them be relative equals.  But the accumulation of Fate points never quite worked for me and I agree that using attributes and traits instead of skills seems a bit simpler.

Mistborn has a few ideas that make me think superheros.
First, the magic system has stunts.  Something that I've been big on since I saw it in the Marvel RPG.
Second, it has rules for reputation combat.  So, there's a full set of stats for running smear campaigns, turning the police force against a hero (or a villain), or any of a hundred other plots that always seems to plague heroes in comics but not in RPGs.
Last, Outcome and Nudges work in my mind for Heroic actions.  Things like using nudges to make sure bystanders are not hurt (or are hurt if you're a villain), smashing a goon to intimidate a group, or even having the burn pattern from a fire blast look like a phoenix.

I've only run Mistborn twice so far, so... It hasn't gone beyond planning stages yet.
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Gwathdring
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« Reply #14 on: April 16, 2012, 02:02:44 PM »

I can see this working really well for a Superhero game. I love the idea of playing with the heroes' reputations and forcing them to balance their activities with public perceptions. The prospect of a hero having to avoid law enforcement and other "good guys" as a result of their own in-game screw ups sounds quite promising. I'm going to keep this in mind if I ever run a Superhero game. I also agree, the specific Mistborn magic system could really easily be tweaked to support classic super-heroics.

I was thinking about trying a star wars adaptation. I think it would work pretty well.

Ooh. That actually sounds like a relatively easy conversion. Attributes, Standings, and Resiliences can pretty much stay as they are, though the flavor of Spirit can shift. The only thing that seems to need tweaking is the powers system, but even that could be relatively straightforward ... a lot of the things Force Powers can do are already built into various metals so there's a lot of reference for how to stat damage on, for example, a Force-pushed crate. Emotional Allomancy is a lot weaker than Jedi Mind powers, but the sorts of things that typical Brass/Zinc users can do are of similar strength to Obi-Wan's small mind tricks in A New Hope so it still provides a nice stating baseline.

I see two main approaches here. 1) There is a single Force rating, and stunts do all the heavy lifting in differentiating Force abilities. 2) A Force breakdown sort of like what we've seen in a lot of the Star Wars video games--Jedi Knight had Push, Pull, Speed, Jump, and so forth. You could write up a similar list to your taste and either throw in an additional skill for miscellaneous uses of raw Force powers or just reduce the dice pool of one of the other abilities when it is applied in a way that requires fudging.


The trouble I've run into with my supernatural game is finding something else to do with Standings. Resources, Influence and Spirit don't quite fit into my design. Players have a well understood ability to obtain equipment and resources via the RCMP and won't be experiencing enough political intrigue for them to spend resources on being influential. My current solution, is to break the Physical, Social, and Mental realms into a Power and a Control rather than Attribute and Standing. Something like Might/Presence/Reason and Agility/Savvy/Wits. I'm still tweaking the breakdown between them, but I feel like this approach allows me to keep a the most effective parts of Mistborn's character system while simply shifting the scale of the game to focus on the characters' here and now. It also means I can still sensibly add the two together for calculating resiliences.

I believe I've figured out a nice alternative magic system as well. For the purposes of character creation, it's a third score block that contains (working names) Influence, Knowledge and Connection. Influence is your power rating--how much of a supernatural punch you have. Knowledge is how much the character knows about supernatural mythos, religious traditions, and so forth--it doesn't necessarily represent what the character knows to be true, just how much total supernatural data the character has. High Knowledge can represent an unbelieving scholar who happens to uncover the "true" versions of the supernatural topics she studies without believing them. Connection is how receptive to the supernatural a character is.  A high connection can represent significant supernatural belief/superstition, a strong supernatural radar and/or the ability to perceive the supernatural without becoming mentally unstable.

All three can be "spent" in much the same way Standings are spent in Mistborn. They're used, respectively, to alter reality**, remember useful supernatural detail, and gain significant supernatural understanding of a situation. Characters need to recover their powers, do additional research, and re-attune themselves during breathers to be perpetually using these abilities. These can be increased or decreased during play as well if, for example, a character with a low Knowledge has a long chat with a sorcerer who gives the character the supernatural low-down or comes across the Necronomicon.

**Influence has two uses. First, it is the number of points allocated for buying supernatural powers. Your Influence score, however, is also a sort of Standing just like Knowledge and Connection. Spending Influence is not a direct use of purchased powers, rather it is a blunt, granular use of power that allows for things similar to catching a lucky break, or at high levels, performing feats of power that would normally require a purchased power. A high influence can let a powerful Telepath temporarily summon a poorly controlled blast of fire.
« Last Edit: April 16, 2012, 02:29:35 PM by Gwathdring » Logged
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