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Author Topic: Fantasy Craft Second Printing Q&A Thread  (Read 114615 times)
TKDB
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« Reply #2130 on: April 11, 2014, 02:28:35 PM »

It occurs to me that I'm not aware of any rule regarding bonuses to resist trips and such for having more legs. Is that intentional? It seems odd to me that a drake would be easier to trip than a giant.

Other than Drake, the only other two races that would normally have more than 2 legs are Rootwalker and Unborn. Both of them can get Many-Legged which gives them Improved Stability.

Drakes are also Large, so they have a +2 bonus per size category smaller the tripper is.
That's nice and all, but the point is that any other large race gets that same bonus. A drake is no harder to trip than an ogre, even though you'd imagine they would be due to the additional legs to redistribute their weight to. And while a human can trip a drake (albeit with a little difficulty, due to the +2 bonus), a giant (which is no bigger than a drake) is flatly untrippable by anything of size medium or smaller. There's something really weird about that.

It's also relevant for a variety of monsters in the bestiary, not just drakes. To list a few other examples of quadrupedal (or otherwise more-than-bipedal) creatures that gain no benefits to resist tripping:
  • A basilisk as statted in the bestiary has EIGHT legs, but is no harder to trip than a human (assuming equal Acrobatics skill bonus).
  • Bears are likewise no harder to trip than a human, unless they're grizzly bears in which case they're in the same boat as drakes.
  • Chimeras are in the same boat as drakes.
  • Guard and war dogs are no harder to trip than a comparably-acrobatic pech or goblin, and riding dogs no harder to trip than a human.
  • Full-blown dragons are no harder to trip than a giant, despite being a whole size category larger (generally corresponding to as much as double the size) and having more legs to stand on.
  • Giant spiders, of all things, are no more resilient to tripping than a pech or goblin (for a brown stalker) or a drake or ogre (for a great lasher).

And similar things can be said for bulettes, triceratops, griffons, hippogriffs, hell hounds, draft horses, race horses, ponies, lamias, manticores, pegasus, rhinos, shadow beasts, tigers, and wolves.
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« Reply #2131 on: April 11, 2014, 02:43:38 PM »

While I can see the case being made, and I agree that some of these things should have Improved Stability, let me say that having 'more legs' does not automatically equate to being 'more stable'. If you look at the Trip action in terms of it's result, sending the target sprawled, all you are really doing is knocking the target over. This is a more function of center of gravity, rather than how many feet you have. Horses actually are incredibly easy to trip. With one hand, no less.
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« Reply #2132 on: April 11, 2014, 03:32:56 PM »

  • Guard and war dogs are no harder to trip than a comparably-acrobatic pech or goblin, and riding dogs no harder to trip than a human.

I can trip a guard dog.
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« Reply #2133 on: April 11, 2014, 04:51:26 PM »

While I can see the case being made, and I agree that some of these things should have Improved Stability, let me say that having 'more legs' does not automatically equate to being 'more stable'. If you look at the Trip action in terms of it's result, sending the target sprawled, all you are really doing is knocking the target over. This is a more function of center of gravity, rather than how many feet you have. Horses actually are incredibly easy to trip. With one hand, no less.

This, some animals might be harder to sweep their legs out from underneath them, but essentially just body checking them or shoving them at an odd angle and they tumble really easily.
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« Reply #2134 on: April 11, 2014, 11:46:04 PM »

Animal training skill will let you add improved stability to any animal a player regularly uses they think will need it. 2 XP will let the GM add it to anything they think will need it. Dwarves and Giants get it natively (including in their critter templates), Rootwalkers and Unborn can get it if they want it without it always counting against their (limited) pool of design points. Is the concern really any deeper than that? I guess it would be a plus if there was a Drake option for it somewhere, but that race is not exactly starved for cool choices, and its kinda hard to trip them when they're aloft... Flight > Improved Stability Smiley.

Its really easy for the GM to add it to most things (other than player characters, who do or don't have it for balance reasons) so if its important to you, cough up the 2 XP. But the default RAW does not draw an absolute correlation between more feet on the floor and tactically advantageous squatness.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2014, 11:56:11 PM by Morgenstern » Logged

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« Reply #2135 on: April 12, 2014, 12:28:41 AM »

I kinda like the idea of Tripping flying things as a means of knocking them out of the air.
If not that, then how perhaps?
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« Reply #2136 on: April 12, 2014, 08:26:56 AM »

I kinda like the idea of Tripping flying things as a means of knocking them out of the air.
If not that, then how perhaps?

I totally agree.  It would be very easy to fluff it as you are hitting their wings to disrupt their flight and make them fall.  I once had an Air Walk spell cast on me and used a Bull Rush attack to knock a flying enemy out of the air; rammed him and sent him tumbling causing him to lose control and crash.
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« Reply #2137 on: April 12, 2014, 01:57:35 PM »

Incidentally, Improved Stability has now made my list of stuff to stick on a feat for flightless, burrowing rock drakes Smiley
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« Reply #2138 on: April 13, 2014, 10:19:54 PM »

A question that has come up a few times, and never gotten a clear answer, or has gotten mixed answers, but, in multiple places, there are attacks that deal a multiple of "X damage." Blade Flurry, Multi-Shot, a few others.

If it says you deal your weapons damage again, does that mean just the damage die, or the damage of the attack in general?

Does 1d6+3 attack become 3d6+9, or 3d6+3? ALSO, I know that you are stuck on a single opponent and they are not separate actions, but do they count as multiple HITS, or is it  a flat damage boost?

This is important because if it's 1 hit, that's additive damage for the purposes of Critical Injury or Massive Damage. If they're multiple hits, that means that dealing subdual damage with one of those options is incredibly potent, especially with Bird Arrows and Blackened Sky. You can force an opponent to potentially make 12 subdual saves in a single round. For Blade Flurry, this means you could use a combination of Flashing/Darting Weapon and Flail basics to reliably get +12 to hit, +12 damage on every attack your next turn.

How does it work?
a) 1d6+3 becomes a single hit of 3d6+9
b) 1d6+3 becomes three separate hits of 1d6+3
c) 1d6+3 becomes a single hit of 3d6+3
d) 1d6+3 becomes a single hit of 1d6+3 and 2 hits of 1d6

Which one of these is the proper version?

Also, as an added note, how does Run Through work? Would it be more similar to a, or c, above?
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« Reply #2139 on: April 14, 2014, 03:40:28 AM »

I've always ruled b).
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« Reply #2140 on: April 14, 2014, 07:26:49 AM »

It is three separate hits of, in your example, 1d6+3 each.  Meaning that each individual hit is subject to damage reduction and resistances and is three separate Damage Saves for Standard Characters.  Also when inflicting Subdual damage, such as using Multi-Shot with Bird Arrows against a Special Character that is three saves vs the subdual damage.

At least, that is how our group plays it.

Run through is just straight up double damage as one hit.

To me, the wording is what separates it.  Blade Flurry says "you inflict the knife’s damage an additional time." while Run Through says "You also inflict double your spear damage."  To me, "An additional time" says it is a separate instance while "Double" says it is one instance.
« Last Edit: April 14, 2014, 07:32:12 AM by Slashes-With-Claws » Logged

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« Reply #2141 on: April 15, 2014, 07:32:19 PM »

How does Tumble and Fencing Mastery's En Garde! trick work? Charge Basics specifies it ignores adjacency, but Tumble lets you move through adjacent squares, while still being adjacent. Does this mean that if you tried to tumble past an enemy in En Garde!, they would get 3 free "save or be hits" against you?
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« Reply #2142 on: April 15, 2014, 08:12:32 PM »

How does Tumble and Fencing Mastery's En Garde! trick work? Charge Basics specifies it ignores adjacency, but Tumble lets you move through adjacent squares, while still being adjacent. Does this mean that if you tried to tumble past an enemy in En Garde!, they would get 3 free "save or be hits" against you?

I would say no, there is only one save made, as En Garde! is worded "each opponent who", rather than "each time an opponent", tying the language to the opponents themselves rather than the movement.
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« Reply #2143 on: April 15, 2014, 11:41:30 PM »

Charge doesn't protect against En Guard either.

Olé!
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« Reply #2144 on: April 16, 2014, 04:47:37 PM »

How does Tumble and Fencing Mastery's En Garde! trick work? Charge Basics specifies it ignores adjacency, but Tumble lets you move through adjacent squares, while still being adjacent. Does this mean that if you tried to tumble past an enemy in En Garde!, they would get 3 free "save or be hits" against you?

I would say no, there is only one save made, as En Garde! is worded "each opponent who", rather than "each time an opponent", tying the language to the opponents themselves rather than the movement.

Perhaps, but that would mean that the Stance and the Mastery Trick no longer affect each other, which would SIGNIFICANTLY nerf the feat tree. Also, En Garde! makes no distinction on number of times it can be used per round or combat, giving the impression that it would be more or less "at will".
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