Back to Crafty Games Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
November 27, 2014, 04:56:00 PM
Home Help Search Login Register
News: Welcome to the Crafty Games Forums!

Note to New Members: To combat spam, we have instituted new rules: you must post 5 replies to existing threads before you can create new threads.

+  Crafty Games Forum
|-+  Community
| |-+  Off-Topic
| | |-+  Golden Oldies: Classic Film & TV thread
« previous next »
Pages: 1 2 [3] Go Down Print
Author Topic: Golden Oldies: Classic Film & TV thread  (Read 1047 times)
Desertpuma
Control
******
Posts: 4322


Highest Level LSpy Agent 16th, almost 17th


View Profile WWW
« Reply #30 on: October 26, 2014, 06:46:04 AM »

Yes, that's why I have been looking in my spare time but not really finding anything on it
Logged



Living Spycraft Masterm
Krensky
Control
******
Posts: 7144


WWTWD?


View Profile
« Reply #31 on: October 27, 2014, 10:15:57 AM »

Getting back on topic, If you have access to Hulu, you should go watch I Spy.

It's still one of the best espionage shows ever done. Exotic locations (it was actually shot on location in Africa, Asia, and Europe), great banter and chemistry between Culp and Cosby. Amazing for it's time Cosby's the brains of the team and not in any way Culp's sidekick or underling. He's also typically the straight man for the infrequent comedic bits.

Also it has an almost complete absence of 1960s espionage TV wackiness and gadgets.
Logged

We can lick gravity, but sometimes the paperwork is overwhelming. - Werner von Braun
Right now you have no idea how lucky you are that I am not a sociopath. - A sign seen above my desk.
There's no upside in screwing with things you can't explain. - Captain Roy Montgomery
Valentina
Control
******
Posts: 2174



View Profile
« Reply #32 on: October 28, 2014, 06:10:19 AM »

Yes, that's why I have been looking in my spare time but not really finding anything on it


I can't deny that I find the idea repugnant, but really there's only one valid answer: if there's proof and it stands up to peer review, I'm interested.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2014, 06:15:27 AM by Valentina » Logged

"Cui bono?" -Lucius Cassius Longinus Ravilla, 127 BCE.

"Hier stehe ich, ich kann nicht anders" -Martin Luthor, 1483-1546.
TheAuldGrump
Control
******
Posts: 3290


Because The Cat Told Me To...


View Profile
« Reply #33 on: October 29, 2014, 09:45:37 AM »

That said, however stuffed as the boxes might have been there wasn't a shortage of troops, supplies, or officers willing to back that choice. If the fix was in, it was a popular fix all same.
There were constant shortages of troops and supplies in the south.  All they really had going for them were their generals.
I had an history professor that maintained that at least two of the Confederate states had more volunteers in the Army of the Republic than they did in the Confederate army.

Not total number of soldiers, mind, simply the volunteers.

That there was that great a separation between the the leadership of those states and the hard scrabble farmers and miners that made up the majority of their populations. It was the monied land owners that wanted secession and the right to own other human beings as property.

The professor was from South Carolina, and was of the opinion that Lee should have been hanged, not for the war, but for continuing the war far past the point where the South had no chance of victory.

Revisionist history is a tempting fruit, but one best avoided.

As for whether the South would have been allowed to secede, had they not fired on Fort Sumter... I kind of doubt it, but a small island off of the coast of Maine did de facto secede just a bit before the Civil War - an act not officially recognized by the US government, but recognized by the US Post Office, the Treasury Department (including the Coast Guard), and the draft boards.

Wiscongus remained separate from the US until WWII.... (A patriotic surge because of the war and an aging Postmaster led to the island rejoining the Union.)

Mind you, we are talking about maybe a couple of hundred people here.... Easy enough to ignore.

The Auld Grump - the one attempt by the draft boards to conscript soldiers during the Civil War was driven off by the wives of Wiscongous throwing hot potatoes at the soldiers....
Logged

I don't know how the story ends...
But I do know what happens next.
Pages: 1 2 [3] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.13 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!