Author Topic: Origin benefit question  (Read 2092 times)

Mister Andersen

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Origin benefit question
« on: June 21, 2007, 10:54:07 AM »
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Once per scene during a manhunt or chase dramatic conflict after strategies are revealed, you may change your strategy for that round to any other legal strategy. If two opposing characters use this ability during the same round, both abilities are expended without effect.

I could really see the reason you'd want this in a 1.0 game where the Predator and Prey moves were matrixed in a table with the check modifier determined by the interplay of strategies, but what's the point in a 2.0 game?

Psion

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Re: Origin benefit question
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2007, 11:50:32 AM »
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Once per scene during a manhunt or chase dramatic conflict after strategies are revealed, you may change your strategy for that round to any other legal strategy. If two opposing characters use this ability during the same round, both abilities are expended without effect.

I could really see the reason you'd want this in a 1.0 game where the Predator and Prey moves were matrixed in a table with the check modifier determined by the interplay of strategies, but what's the point in a 2.0 game?

I would think it would be to keep the opponent from using a strategy you know would hose you... like, say, if you know your opponent has a really good skill that can be exploited by a twist in a manhunt, and you want to keep them from using it.
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Crafty_Alex

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Re: Origin benefit question
« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2007, 12:00:02 PM »
Quote
Once per scene during a manhunt or chase dramatic conflict after strategies are revealed, you may change your strategy for that round to any other legal strategy. If two opposing characters use this ability during the same round, both abilities are expended without effect.

I could really see the reason you'd want this in a 1.0 game where the Predator and Prey moves were matrixed in a table with the check modifier determined by the interplay of strategies, but what's the point in a 2.0 game?

I see this being used offensively and defensively, mainly as a way to capitalize on your opponent's penalty. Say you're in a chase as Predator, and your opponent takes a fairly safe strategy to escape, while you've chosen a risky one to greatly reduce the lead - at that point, you may choose to take the safest possible strategy to ensure you're on par with his roll (or use your That's Impossible! right then to keep the chase from ending). Alternatively, if you're in the same chase, and your opponent reveals a risky strategy, you might choose a safe one on the off chance you will get more benefits by effectively increasing your relative bonus.

It's subtle, but I see this ability having a great many uses when the chips are down...
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Morgenstern

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Re: Origin benefit question
« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2007, 12:41:29 PM »
Its also an evil little defense against effects like the Driving Instincts feat.
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Mister Andersen

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Re: Origin benefit question
« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2007, 01:28:15 PM »
Surprisingly, I actually miss the DramCon matrix...

Psion

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Re: Origin benefit question
« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2007, 03:37:15 PM »
I see this being used offensively and defensively, mainly as a way to capitalize on your opponent's penalty. Say you're in a chase as Predator, and your opponent takes a fairly safe strategy to escape, while you've chosen a risky one to greatly reduce the lead - at that point, you may choose to take the safest possible strategy to ensure you're on par with his roll (or use your That's Impossible! right then to keep the chase from ending). Alternatively, if you're in the same chase, and your opponent reveals a risky strategy, you might choose a safe one on the off chance you will get more benefits by effectively increasing your relative bonus.

Heh. I never really thought about it that way, but now that you put it that way, that's really similar to the way psychic combats work in the mindscapes combat system in Hyperconscious.

With a little tidying, it's almost its own dramatic conflict. :)
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