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Poll
Question: Which system of magic dou you prefer?
Skill/Feat System
Spell Point System
Skill/Feat/Spell Point System
Spells and Spellslots (Standard D&D)
Something Else (Describe Below).

Author Topic: [Poll] Magic in Spycraft - Preferences?  (Read 3346 times)
TheAuldGrump
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« on: July 03, 2007, 09:47:56 PM »

Hmmm, idle curiosity from the Elements of Magic: Mythic Europe thread - My own preference is for a Skill/Feat system, with the casters limited by their choice of skills, feats, and ability to withstand subdual damage.

Spellbound seems a hybrid between that and a spell point system, fewer skills required, spell points for casting, and choices limited to a single school.

What other systems have folks used for Spycraft?

The Auld Grump, inquiring minds, etc..
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TheAuldGrump
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« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2007, 11:34:57 PM »

So far a three way tie for first place....

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« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2007, 11:42:49 PM »

I've used a mixture of a Skill/Feat/Spell Point for Spell Casting.

It was based off Elements of Magic:Revised but I'm currently going to switch to the Mythic Earth version, and I might even do away with Spell Points this time.
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spinningdice
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« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2007, 01:49:17 AM »

I have no preference, really (apart from having come to detest the classic D&D system). Different methods fit different settings to an extent..
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OverNinja
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« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2007, 03:41:35 AM »

I like the Spellbound system, but I also like the D&D system (only thing I dislike about it is the memorize spells part).
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spinningdice
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« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2007, 04:46:46 AM »

So by D&D system you mean D&D sorcerers/bards then?
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Antilles
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« Reply #6 on: July 04, 2007, 05:26:45 AM »

I'm not quite sure why, but I really like the magic system in the Wheel of Time d20 RPG. It might be because I feel they caught the general vibe of the books so well. Still, it's a fun system I thought.
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« Reply #7 on: July 04, 2007, 07:52:56 AM »

So by D&D system you mean D&D sorcerers/bards then?

More or less. Prepping the right spells at the right time was/is a major pain, so we had a house rule (in 2nd Ed. AD&D) that was similar to how the sorcerer now works, but you could still learn new spells whenever you got your appendages on them.
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« Reply #8 on: July 04, 2007, 12:01:56 PM »

The question is very vague. I like the spell slot system and I think it works well. I am opposed to the notion of changing it for D&D.

But so long as the system is well designed, there's a number of angles you could take for it. If your game has different goals than D&D, and your system meets it well, that's all that matters.
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TheAuldGrump
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« Reply #9 on: July 04, 2007, 12:42:23 PM »

I intended my question to be a bit vague - I want to hear what people do for magic rather than just look at what they chose on the poll.

That I might find an idea worth stealing is of course besides the point. (Hmmm, no shifty eyed emoticon... a wink will have to do.  Wink )

For D&D the spell system sort of works, but my all time favorite magic system is that of Ars Magica - now converting that to Spycraft would take some work - mages would need an entire new skill system to account for all the arts and forms.

My first encounter with a spell point like system was RuneQuest 1st ed. - another good magic system that would not convert easily. I do not much like me the new Runequests changes to the magic.

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« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2007, 03:33:05 PM »

I like the flexibility provided by power point systems, but I really thought the Wheel of Time d20 chances to cast extra spells and take subdual damage was neat.

The D&D slot system is ok.  It works for the world it is in but it could be better.
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« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2007, 03:36:51 PM »

I have a High Magic feat roughed in that lets you take subdual for spell points, but the ratio is eeeevil. "Soul-casting" will put you out of the fight in seconds if you abuse it.
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« Reply #12 on: July 12, 2007, 04:11:34 AM »

One thing I don't like is magic being reliable... I love the idea of playing with forces that aren't quite understood, and when things go wrong... they go very wrong.
Having some sort of skill check involved is good, if you're rolling a skill check you can roll an error...
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« Reply #13 on: July 12, 2007, 08:26:16 AM »

I really can't answer the poll because it entirely depends on the setting.

For "standard" modern games, I'll assume no magic at all.  If I'm going for something with a Cthulhu/Tomb Raider/Indiane Jones-vibe, I'll basically use the Cthulhu d20 system, which is essentially no caster class or casting abilities.  If you find a spellbook or instructions for a ritual, anyone can attempt.  Each spell/ritual/incantation has its own effects and rules.

After that it entirely depends.  In some settings I might have a specific caster class.  In others, you might have to spend feats or skill points in order to use magic.

I'm not a fan of generic magic systems in a system that's meant to be used in a variety of settings.

The campaign and setting fluff should dictate the magic system.
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Antilles
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« Reply #14 on: July 12, 2007, 09:42:17 AM »

Heh, the Overcasting system in Wheel of Time RPG was all kinds of neat. If you were out of weave slots, you could attempt to cast a 0, 1st or 2nd level weave, with increasing difficulty. You could also try to increase the level of a weave, up to 5 I think, but that was fairly difficult. Failure ranged from headache for the rest of the day to being burned out - losing the ability to cast weaves.

One of the reasons this had more of an impact than it seems, is because WoT has relatively few spells, but many spells have several levels of effectiveness, or you can improve the spell somehow by increasing the caster level. I.e. Gust of Wind (or something, haven't got the book with me), at the lowest level it can blow out a candle, at the highest level it can level buildings in a 10-mile radius. Also of note is the ultimate bad-ass spell Balefire, which not only utterly annihilate everything it hits, it actually annihilate the character or object back in time as well. Fire it off at the lowest level (8 or 9), and you burn 1 or 2 rounds back in time. If you crank it up to level 13 (note: you can only get up to weave level 9, so you'll have to overchannel if you wanna use it at this level), you'll burn them out for months backwards in time.

I guess I should stop gushing about the WoT magic system, but it somehow hits all my buttons; I just love it Smiley.
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