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 91 
 on: October 16, 2014, 06:10:13 PM 
Started by Mister Andersen - Last post by Valentina
Si, si -I get that.
It's the commonplace wisdom about interactive entertainment in general these days. Mainstream videogaming has a very similar philosophy -keep it simple, keep it parse-able, keep the experience streamlined.
And frankly if you can write an RPG "Call of Duty" scale hit hell yes you should. Hipster "artisan crafted" taglines don't move units by themselves any more then critical industry approval awards.

But to extend that metaphor a little further there's a major glut of dead-on-arrival-in-the-discount-bin Modern Warfare-alikes that thought authoring a "go to brown/grey places and shoot brown/grey people" would be a short line to a million-plus sales and discovered quite the contrary.

Competing with the big cats for even a scrap of the kibble is still a gamble, just a gamble in the other direction. CoD has a pedigree, MoW has a bazillion-dollar budget, but who's in third place? In my mind it's Spec Ops: the Line -which has neither, but won attention with some serious thematic testicles.

So anyway I'm plenty interested in upcoming Crafty production like always, but I want to point out that going too far into accessibility risks becoming shallow and forgettable. I know that Crafty's never been about producing crap and that it'd be awesome to win a massive payday so you can finally un-mortage your house and pay down your credit cards and buy back your kids and whatever else is required to make the dream finally come true, but I want to point out that it's very possible to end up failing the other way and end up producing something generic that pleases nobody.

I doubt that's a real risk, I can't even name another Modern RPG, but anyway -whatever, it's all good. Cool

 92 
 on: October 16, 2014, 06:07:53 PM 
Started by Nuaurpy - Last post by Nuaurpy
Testing the water on an idea, what is the thoughts? Too powerful?

  Impressive Mind I: At level 1 you gain Notice(Perception). With success against DC 10+TL+Wis you become aware of a character, that you can see or hear, using an ability to gain information about you (knowledge, cold read, Detect Alignment, etc.) with a critical success you also discover what they learned about you. Also 1/session when you or a teammate gain a clue you may spend 6 hours reviewing the clue to improve its quality by one step, a clue can only be improve by 1 grade in this way, no matter how many Investigators are involved.
  Impressive Mind II: At level 10, when you catch someone trying to glean information about you you may also spend 1 action dice to make one of their results inaccurate. Also you may perform your review in 1 hour.
  Impressive Mind III: At level 20, you may instead make all of their results inaccurate at the cost of 1 Action Die per result. Also you can review a clue 2/session and you may perform your review in 1 minute.

 93 
 on: October 16, 2014, 06:01:06 PM 
Started by Nuaurpy - Last post by Morgenstern
The basic concept/mechanic you had - get a clue (by whatever means), kick in a +15 to the roll after the fact was really tasty without being all that ridiculously powerful. I just keep seeing characters from Elementary or NCIS sitting up all night with a pile of document/photos and then having something new to share with the team the next morning without ever leaving the house/office. Letting the Inspector review other people's clues is equal parts useful synergy and potentially smarmy Wink.

 94 
 on: October 16, 2014, 05:42:25 PM 
Started by Nuaurpy - Last post by Nuaurpy
Holy shit! Okay, so I'm going to work with that a little bit. That's way better than the idea that I had. although the idea I had is still an idea I might work with.

 95 
 on: October 16, 2014, 05:37:46 PM 
Started by Nuaurpy - Last post by Morgenstern
That's disappointing; understandable though. You were the person I figured would be able to polish Sudden Insight the best. I'll have to wait and hope for some advice from some of the other LoI regulars.

Having just watched all of season 2 of Elementary over the last week, I'm feeling pretty steeped in consulting detective motifs at the moment Smiley. I'm also feeling pretty good about the number 1 enemy of the investigator being the clock...

Just tinkering I get something like...

  Deductions I: At level 1, your Wisdom rises by 1 and whenever you or a teammate gain a clue you may spend 6 hours reviewing the clue to improve its quality by one step (eg. Fruitful to illuminating).
  Deductions II: At level 10, your Wisdom rises by 1 and you may perform your review in 1 hour.
  Deductions III: At level 20, your Wisdom rises by 1 and you may perform your review in 1 minute.

Alternatively if you wanted to go back to having a flawless pair in A, these could go into B quite neatly. There is good precedent for time reduction effects in B with both the Explorer and Sage.

 96 
 on: October 16, 2014, 05:31:10 PM 
Started by Nuaurpy - Last post by Nuaurpy
 Very glad I sat down and banged out more of mine before reading through this as there are a lot of interesting ideas at work here. Now I have only a couple slots left to fill before facing the temptation to replicate goodies found here Smiley. The sharp senses ability was definitely an "oof, missed that one" for me Smiley.

  Personally I would avoid having both a flawless ability at level 1 and a skill cap booster in 2/11/19 in the same class. Keep in mind also they serve different purposes - one allows spectacular successes along with semi-frequent failures, while the other doesn't drive up the peak performance at all but is constantly warding off the whoopses. The two have very different feel in play - genius vs. meticulousness. If you need the class to cover a lot of potential ground go with the skill cap but allow choices. Having it pop at 2/11/19 but letting players pick the order the skills are boosted (or which three out of a list of more than 3) lets the class cover very different concepts even at it's earliest levels.

  I admit I plan to cheat and cheat vigorously - since I'm basically reinstituting some of the old dramatic conflicts as very stripped down mini-games I've also allowed myself the luxury of assuming the existence of a "Detective Feat Tree". Again, this is with an eye towards one class supporting a multitude of mechanics with greater player control over how the see themselves in the role. It also means that after giving over the spine (C slot) to feats I have to concentrate on the absolutely essential in all other slots.

 Though in some respects I don't see myself finalizing my solver classes without having a look at my Thief and Con-Artist, as the two sides of the coin should definitely play off each other a bit. Holmes is made vastly better by having a Moriarity. You might do the same here with less labor by re-reading the Burglar and Assassin classes and asking 'how can this class better pit itself against those?'

I'm still looking for a way to replace the flawless ability. I feel back on it when I couldn't think of a good level 1 ability for him, but really, I'm not in love with it. Especially since I just reworked him Core into

Case by Case Basis: Your Legend increases by 1. Also, at Level 1 and for each Class Level thereafter, you gain 1 additional skill point that must be spent on Investigate or Sense motive.

So ya, I want to completely drop flawless at level 1.

Looking at the "criminal" classes is a very good idea, thank you. That might give me the insight I need for the level 1 and maybe some other changes.

 97 
 on: October 16, 2014, 05:10:07 PM 
Started by Mister Andersen - Last post by RusVal




As long as there is no Grown Ups 3 opening the same weekend, it'll do great.  Tongue

 98 
 on: October 16, 2014, 05:02:19 PM 
Started by Mister Andersen - Last post by Tegyrius
You'd be a man who'd know, but I want to raise a tepid objection in the name of system mastery.
Sure it's complicated, but it's learnable and I think ultimately worthwhile.
The point's not simulation, but emulation. Doesn't have to be just like reality, but a reasonable fake at least.

I think a lot of d20/D&D3/OGL-inspired game design can be described as trying to write tabletop RPGs as computer scripting languages.  Lotta procedural statements in something like, say, Spycraft 2.  It's fun for the players who like optimizing their characters' functions but kind of a high bar to entry for everyone else.  And I think this hobby's at a point where we need some easy-entry gateway drugs that don't lock out any prospective new gamers through excess complexity.  For the archetypal RPG, what I'm seeing out of D&D5 was the right call for that.

- C.

 99 
 on: October 16, 2014, 04:37:03 PM 
Started by Nuaurpy - Last post by Morgenstern
  Very glad I sat down and banged out more of mine before reading through this as there are a lot of interesting ideas at work here. Now I have only a couple slots left to fill before facing the temptation to replicate goodies found here Smiley. The sharp senses ability was definitely an "oof, missed that one" for me Smiley.

  Personally I would avoid having both a flawless ability at level 1 and a skill cap booster in 2/11/19 in the same class. Keep in mind also they serve different purposes - one allows spectacular successes along with semi-frequent failures, while the other doesn't drive up the peak performance at all but is constantly warding off the whoopses. The two have very different feel in play - genius vs. meticulousness. If you need the class to cover a lot of potential ground go with the skill cap but allow choices. Having it pop at 2/11/19 but letting players pick the order the skills are boosted (or which three out of a list of more than 3) lets the class cover very different concepts even at it's earliest levels.

  I admit I plan to cheat and cheat vigorously - since I'm basically reinstituting some of the old dramatic conflicts as very stripped down mini-games I've also allowed myself the luxury of assuming the existence of a "Detective Feat Tree". Again, this is with an eye towards one class supporting a multitude of mechanics with greater player control over how the see themselves in the role. It also means that after giving over the spine (C slot) to feats I have to concentrate on the absolutely essential in all other slots.

 Though in some respects I don't see myself finalizing my solver classes without having a look at my Thief and Con-Artist, as the two sides of the coin should definitely play off each other a bit. Holmes is made vastly better by having a Moriarity. You might do the same here with less labor by re-reading the Burglar and Assassin classes and asking 'how can this class better pit itself against those?'

 100 
 on: October 16, 2014, 04:02:25 PM 
Started by Morgenstern - Last post by Morgenstern
  Personally I prefer that it be spelled out right there rather than forcing a page flip Smiley. Doubly so after people arguing "frenzy must only apply to NPCs because it says 'this NPC' in the text..." Still, it would be best to use unified terminology. Good catch. Will tinker.
  On the bright side its one less class ability I have to come up with an NPC XP value for Grin.

  ...and yeah, I'd forgotten free attacks had the 'final' restriction folded directly into them Tongue.

 

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