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 91 
 on: October 19, 2014, 03:58:32 AM 
Started by Crafty_Pat - Last post by Bill Whitmore
By contrast, it makes plenty of sense for a low-Prudence character to realize, "Man, I have a terrible habit of always blowing all my coin on ale and wenches. Hey, Bob, you're good with money. Can I ask you to hang onto this for me to save me from my own stupidity?" It's the difference between an in-character and an out-of-character solution to the problem. It's one thing if you're buying things you actually intend to use but could sell off to fund a more important purchase, but personally, if I were GMing for a player who kept buying stuff solely for investment purposes to circumvent a low Prudence, I'd probably start revoking last-call shopping privileges if they didn't cut it out when asked nicely.

This is where I disagree. Realizing that you suck at saving money and need to hire a financial planner to do it for you is something Prudent people do.

It's really just another cheesy way to take max Panache (and Income) and then never having to suffer the consequences of having a zero Prudence.

I would agree, but here's a question.

What would you say if a high prudence character said "Look Jim, you keep spending all your money at the horse track. From now on I think if it's best that I hold on to the majority of your money for you." to the other character?

Unfortunately this comes from personal experience Sad, but the usual response from someone with no prudence is "F*&@ off, it's my money, I'm going to spend it however I want."

But even if said character agreed, high Panache has a higher income (more coin in hand at the start of each adventure) and lives a flashier lifestyle that gives a benefit as a higher appearance. If someone else is applying their prudence score to his money, he isn't living as someone who has a higher Panache. If I allow it all, which is unlikely, whatever increased benefit he gains for Prudence is going to be trimmed off his Panache.

* * *

Panache: "All right, all right, I'll stop gambling at the track. At least I still have my woven gold garments, crowns and nightly orgies to look forward to." (Adventure Companion pg 26)
Prudence: "What!? No, you're trying to save money here. No orgies, no gold garments, no crowns."
Panache: "No orgies? Man, how can you even live with yourself."

* * *

Prudence and Panache fall under Lifestyle for a reason. You don't get to live it up AND save it all. Letting someone take all Panache and using someone else's Prudence to basically double their effective Lifestyle is absolutely gaming the system.

 92 
 on: October 19, 2014, 02:25:03 AM 
Started by Crafty_Pat - Last post by Nuaurpy
By contrast, it makes plenty of sense for a low-Prudence character to realize, "Man, I have a terrible habit of always blowing all my coin on ale and wenches. Hey, Bob, you're good with money. Can I ask you to hang onto this for me to save me from my own stupidity?" It's the difference between an in-character and an out-of-character solution to the problem. It's one thing if you're buying things you actually intend to use but could sell off to fund a more important purchase, but personally, if I were GMing for a player who kept buying stuff solely for investment purposes to circumvent a low Prudence, I'd probably start revoking last-call shopping privileges if they didn't cut it out when asked nicely.

This is where I disagree. Realizing that you suck at saving money and need to hire a financial planner to do it for you is something Prudent people do.

It's really just another cheesy way to take max Panache (and Income) and then never having to suffer the consequences of having a zero Prudence.

I would agree, but here's a question.

What would you say if a high prudence character said "Look Jim, you keep spending all your money at the horse track. From now on I think if it's best that I hold on to the majority of your money for you." to the other character?

 93 
 on: October 19, 2014, 02:13:06 AM 
Started by Crafty_Pat - Last post by Bill Whitmore
By contrast, it makes plenty of sense for a low-Prudence character to realize, "Man, I have a terrible habit of always blowing all my coin on ale and wenches. Hey, Bob, you're good with money. Can I ask you to hang onto this for me to save me from my own stupidity?" It's the difference between an in-character and an out-of-character solution to the problem. It's one thing if you're buying things you actually intend to use but could sell off to fund a more important purchase, but personally, if I were GMing for a player who kept buying stuff solely for investment purposes to circumvent a low Prudence, I'd probably start revoking last-call shopping privileges if they didn't cut it out when asked nicely.

This is where I disagree. Realizing that you suck at saving money and need to hire a financial planner to do it for you is something Prudent people do.

It's really just another cheesy way to take max Panache (and Income) and then never having to suffer the consequences of having a zero Prudence.

 94 
 on: October 19, 2014, 02:02:05 AM 
Started by Crafty_Pat - Last post by Desertpuma
Man, I have a terrible habit of always blowing all my coin on ale and wenches.

Whenever I explain Prudence to new players, I always tell them that they keep X% of their money and the rest represents all the silver spent on hookers and blow.

Probably one of the best explanations although I tend to swap out blow for beer

 95 
 on: October 19, 2014, 01:59:11 AM 
Started by Crafty_Pat - Last post by Nuaurpy
Man, I have a terrible habit of always blowing all my coin on ale and wenches.

Whenever I explain Prudence to new players, I always tell them that they keep X% of their money and the rest represents all the silver spent on hookers and blow.

 96 
 on: October 18, 2014, 11:48:37 PM 
Started by Crafty_Pat - Last post by TKDB
Is it at all possible to give money to other party members who have high Prudence for safekeeping before an adventure ends or is that too cheesy?

Personally, I'd say the "save up in the form of items to sell off later" tactic is way cheesier than giving your money to a high-Prudence buddy to look after. Considering what Panache and Prudence are meant to represent, saving up in the form of items is really kind of a failure to roleplay. To me, it feels sort of the same as dumping mental stats to make a beastly combatant and then just using out-of-character smarts to come up with clever plans and solutions even though your character is a dimwitted musclehead who, according to the character sheet, should never be able to come up with such things.

Prudence represents your character's ability for long-term financial planning and impulse control, so loading up on Panache at the expense of Prudence and then effectively giving yourself Prudence 7 (or higher if you can Haggle the resale price up!) for free by investing all your cash on hand in trade goods is pretty cheesy. It's taking advantage of an artifact of the game abstraction to circumvent a mechanical limitation that's supposed to represent a limited ability for your character to do exactly the sort of long-term money management that you're doing.

By contrast, it makes plenty of sense for a low-Prudence character to realize, "Man, I have a terrible habit of always blowing all my coin on ale and wenches. Hey, Bob, you're good with money. Can I ask you to hang onto this for me to save me from my own stupidity?" It's the difference between an in-character and an out-of-character solution to the problem. It's one thing if you're buying things you actually intend to use but could sell off to fund a more important purchase, but personally, if I were GMing for a player who kept buying stuff solely for investment purposes to circumvent a low Prudence, I'd probably start revoking last-call shopping privileges if they didn't cut it out when asked nicely.

Just my take on it, anyway. I have somewhat strong feelings on the matter, but in the end that's only my opinion, and as the system tagline goes, "Your dungeon, your dragon, your way."

 97 
 on: October 18, 2014, 02:47:15 PM 
Started by meatwadf - Last post by meatwadf
Latest update on what was the Mage Hunter. The title was always meant as a place holder, and the new name is Puritan. It just feels like a crazed puritanical witch hunter, so I think it's a good fit.

Puritan

   In many worlds, magic is often a powerful and corrupting force, leading the once noble down dark and vile paths. The Puritan has dedicated themselves to the elimination of those that wield the mystic arts or are empowered by it in some way. Brave and cunning, the Puritan strikes quickly and decisively to end a magical threat.
   Depending on your campaign, a Witch Hunter could be...
A member of a priestly order that rigidly hunts and kill magic users
A mercenary that has made a life out of toppling evil sorcerers in exchange for coin
A squire that gains his knighthood only after bringing back the skin of a magical creature
A wizard that hunts rivals in order to rob them of their secrets
An alchemist that harvest the organs of magical creatures for her elixirs

   Party Role: Combatant. The Puritan is a master of studying magical beings and striking hard and fast before they can bring their powers to bear.

Class Features
   Requirements: Sorcery campaign quality, Base Attack Bonus 3+, Mage Hunter Feat, Study (spellcasting), Charisma 13+
   Favored Attributes: Strength, Charisma
   Class Skills: Athletics, Crafting, Intimidate, Investigate, Notice, Ride, Sneak, Survival, Tactics
   Skill Points: 6 + Int modifier per level
   Vitality: 9 + Con modifier per level

Core Ability
   Shield of Conviction: Your belief in your cause is so great, that your force of will shields you from magical powers. At the start of any combat round, you may spend an action die and gain a bonus to your Spell Defense from Mage Hunter equal to the result for a number of rounds equal to your Charisma modifier. This die may explode.

Class Abilities
   Mana Burn: You have learned to turn a magic user's greatest asset against them. At level 1,  with a successful Threaten action against a character who possesses spell points, you roll stress damage as normal, and they lose an amount of spell points equal to the stress damage inflicted.
   Steel over Sorcery: You have learned to strike at spellcasters with weapons and tactics that inflict maximum damage. At level 2, you gain a bonus die of sneak attack damage against characters that possess 1 or more ranks in the spellcasting skill.
Bonus Feat: At level 3you gain an additional Basic Combat or Style feat.
Know the Mage, Kill the Mage: You have made it your duty to study magic in order to have a better understanding on how to best oppose it. At level 4, when targeted with a spell, you gain a bonus to your save equal to your Intelligence bonus.
Suffer Not the Mage to Live: Magic is a corruption of the natural order, even those merely under the effects of it. At level 5, as a full round action, you may suppress all spells currently cast on a character for a number of rounds equal to your starting action die. Further, you gain a +2 bonus to attack checks when targeting that character.

Now, some notes. I decided to change Shield of Conviction to just counting the action die result as a bonus, due to some testing with spell defense getting crazy. Combining 10 + action die result + the Mage Hunter bonus was getting insane. I'm talking 30 spell defense at level 5 insane. I'm hoping this balances it out more, without lowering its effectiveness. So, for now, it's the die + Mage Hunter bonus, which seems to be working out a bit better.

Mana Burn does now inflict damage to spell points, as that seems a more efficient use of the power.

Steel Over Sorcery is the new name for the level 2 ability, and just seems to sound better.

 98 
 on: October 18, 2014, 02:40:27 PM 
Started by Curator - Last post by meatwadf
I feel that if you're going to do some sort of scarecrow species feat, it would fit the unborn much better as a special construction.

 99 
 on: October 18, 2014, 02:31:34 PM 
Started by Curator - Last post by Morgenstern
In the holiday spirit I recommend browsing the Magic the Gathering's gothic horror block Innistrad just to soak up the luscious art Smiley.

For a bit of Mastercraft crunch, how about some alignments Grin!

Alignments of Innistrad

Church of Avacyn
  “What cannot be destroyed will be bound”
  Dedicated to the survival of Man in the face of Innistrad’s countless terrors. In particular the Church tries to ensure the “Blessed Sleep” preventing the faithful from being violated after death.
  While the Church has enjoyed a living god in the form of the Archangel Avacyn for centuries, she has mysteriously vanished some months before our tale begins.
  The Church’s reach extends to all four of Inistrad’s provinces, but its strongholds and manpower are chiefly gathered within the Province of Gavony. The church is lead by the Lunarch from its central cathedral in the city of Thraben. The office is currently held by Mikaeus, a man of genuine passion and faith and a beacon in these dark times.
  The Church's militant agents are known as cathars and are lead by Guardian-Captain Thalia.

Paths: Angels, Good, Heroism, Knowledge, Protection,
Alignment Skills: Athletics, Ride, Search, Tactics
Ritual Weapon: Longsword (marked with the collar of Avacyn)
Avatar: Moon Heron
Opposed Alignments: Crimson Courts, Cult of Whispers

The Wood-Ways
  “Living wood is the bane of many evils...”
  With the faltering of the protection offered by the Church of Avacyn, many have turned to Innistrad’s older practices, known as the Wood-Ways. These practices were never truly abandoned in the province of Kessig and as a result that region has faired better than many in these dark days.
  Many Werewolves also practice the Wood-ways and humans and werewolves sometimes reach momentary accord through these rites. This has led to some conflicts between human Wood-worshipers and slayers dispatched by the Church, but usually the warriors of Avacyn will turn a blind eye to these pagan practices, putting the survival of race ahead of questions of dogma.

Paths: Nature, Protection, Travel, War, Wilderness
Alignment Skills: Blend, Ride, Search, Survival
Ritual Weapon: Shortbow
Avatar: Wood Elemental
Opposed Alignments: Cult of Whispers, Stitchers

Stitchers
  “Igor? Bring me the brain!”
  Many forms of dark science and necro-alchemy lurk in the mansions and cellars of Inistrad, and have taken root particularly in Nephalia. Stichers are best known for their reanimated creations, alchemical zombies known as skaabs, but they have created numerous other devices and creatures through their experimentation at the edge of sanity.

Paths: Air, Curses, Knowledge, Skaabs, Treachery
Alignment Skills: Bluff, Crafting, Haggle, Investigate
Ritual Weapon: Scalpel
Avatar: Skaab Decimator (enhanced flesh golem)
Opposed Alignments: Crimson Courts, The Wood-Ways

The Crimson Courts
  “It was not fate that brought you into my clutches. No, that was all my doing”
  Prior to the Coming of Avacyn, Innistrad was ruled by vampires. Their four great bloodlines (Falkenrath, Markov, Stromkirk, Voldaren) still hold sway in Stensia Province, and their power is spreading rapidly in Avacyn’s absence.

Paths: Beauty, Blood, Darkness, Strength, War
Alignment Skills: Acrobatics, Athletics, Sneak, Tactics
Ritual Weapon: Bite
Avatar: The Lord of Lineages (master vampire)
Opposed Alignments: Church of Avacyn, Stitchers

Cult of Whispers
  “Every soul has its price”
  The Cult of Whispers counts the both the necromantic Ghoulcallers and those who traffic with demons amongst their ranks. While different branches serve different demon lords, they exercise remarkable ‘professional courtesy towards each other. Rumors about that the cults have infiltrated all levels of the provincial governments and even the highest levels of the Church itself.

Paths: Contracts, Death, Evil, Strength, Treachery
Alignment Skills: Blend, Bluff, Disguise, Sneak
Ritual Weapon: Dagger
Avatar: Reaper from the Abyss (demon)
Opposed Alignments: Church of Avacyn, The Wood-Ways

 100 
 on: October 18, 2014, 11:24:20 AM 
Started by TKDB - Last post by TKDB
My main question is why the class offers Basic Combat as the potential 1st-level feat, rather than say... Style feats, which would fit this class a bit more in my opinion.

I just copy-pasted from the other Legendary <species> classes. You're right, Style would be a lot more appropriate.

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