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 21 
 on: August 01, 2014, 10:48:02 AM 
Started by Slashes-With-Claws - Last post by Mister Andersen
Sadly the system doesn't give you any reason to pick crossbows over regular bows. Ideally, longbows should require a forte to use proficiently.

 22 
 on: August 01, 2014, 10:13:57 AM 
Started by Slashes-With-Claws - Last post by Slashes-With-Claws
Page 182: Bows
Your usual bows and crossbows, as well as a few oddities.

Bow Descriptions:
All bows and crossbows that use bolts or arrows do the same damage, which is based on the ammo.  The main differences are what other effects they have.

Arrows and Bolts: Bows use arrows and crossbows use bolts.  You cannot use the wrong ammo in the wrong weapon.  There is a good variety of ammo you can fire from your bows and crossbows.
Barbed: Causes bleeding and can be poisoned.
Bird: Blunt ammo that causes Subdual Damage.  Can be extremely effective at taking down Special Characters quickly.  Personal experience, my Deadeye, Arilia, took a Special Character from no Fatigue to Unconscious in one round using Bird Arrows thanks to Angry Hornet and Bow Supremacy.
Climbing Line: A rope arrow.  Has lots of uses if the players get creative.  The added weight and drag of the rope reduces the range.
Flaming: Does fire damage.  The rules do not say anything about having to have a fire source to light it so I assume one is not required.
Standard: An ordinary arrow.  Can be poisoned and is good against armor.
Whistler: Can be used to Feint at range or as a signal or other things that you need a noise for.

The main differences between bows and crossbows is that crossbows have a Load Quality, meaning it takes time to reload them and fire another shot, while bows do not.  Crossbows also tend to have AP and longer range.  

Page 183: Black Powder Weapons
Guns!  Early firearms, think flintlock or wheellock.  Maybe even matchlock.  

Page 183: Black Powder Weapon Descriptions
Guns tend to be high damage but low rate of fire.  Effective against a single enemy, but a few Standard Characters with grades of Tough would swarm you before you could take out even one.  They also may blow up in your face (Or whatever else the GM decides) thanks to their large Error Range from Unreliable.  Most games are unlikely to see Black Powder weapons though as most of them are only available in later Eras.

Page 183: Siege Weapons
Do you love raw damage or need to punch a hole in a castle?  Then these are the weapons for you.  The ranged siege weapons tend to have long range, high damage, but very long reload times an most are Stationary.  Do keep in mind though, that a Large Size character with the Siege Feats found in the Adventure Companion can walk around with a heavy ballista and use it like any other weapon (I would assume they would name it Piecemaker).

Page 183-184: Siege Weapon Descriptions
Bring out the big guns!

Cannon, mortar, rockets, catapults, they do lots of damage, take forever to load, and are not easy to move.  While ballista give you an impressive Threat Range.
Battering Ram: Special mention to this weapon.  A large character, like a giant, can use it as their normal weapon without any feats.  As the description text says after talking about how it can smash through stuff, "It can, of course, do the same to people."

One thing I note is missing is ammo.  How much does a cannonball cost?  How much is a ballista bolt?  How much do they weigh?  This kind of info is important when a member of your party is an ogre with a light cannon.

Page 184: Weapon Upgrades
Just like armor, weapons can have one Craftsmanship, one Material, and many Customizations.  Or none of any of those.  Also, like armor, unborn can have weapons permanently attached to them.

Page 184: Weapon Scale
You can use a weapon with a size the same as yours, or smaller than yours.  Weapons cal so be scaled up or down.  Large weapons weigh more, cost more, have a larger Error Range, but also do more damage.  Small weapons weigh less, cost less, still have a larger Error Range, but also do less damage.

Page 185-185: Upgrade Descriptions
Lots of ways to customize your stabby things.

Accurate: Doubles the cost to remove the Inaccurate penalty.
Armor-Piercing: Adds AP 2.
Bayonet (bows and black powder only): Lets you use the weapon as an Edged Weapon in melee.
Bleed: Can cause bleeding.
Bludgeon (black powder only): Adds a nice heavy stock to a gun to let you beat someone over the head with it.
Cavalry: Removes penalties for use while mounted.
Cord (hurled and hurl quality only): Adds a string or rope to a thrown weapon.  Needed if you want to use the Scorpion move from Mortal Kombat, which is in the Adventure Companion by the way.
Crude Materials: Does less damage and breaks easier but is cheaper.
Drake: Craftsmanship that lets you cast spells without a Mage Pouch.
Dwarf: Craftsmanship that makes the weapon very hard to break.
Elf: Craftsmanship that makes the weapon very stylish to Impress people with and weigh less.
Finesse (blunt, edged, and hurled only): Lets you use Dex for damage instead of Str.
Giant: Craftsmanship that increases Threat Range against smaller enemies.  I guess they mean smaller than the user, not smaller than the weapon's Size.
Grip: Lets the user hold the weapon better so it is harder to be disarmed.
Goblin: Craftsmanship that adds a little Sneak Attack Damage and reduces weight.
Hook (blunt and edged only): Gives a bonus to disarming enemies.
Hurl (blunt and edged only): Lets you throw the weapon.
Keen (blunt and edged only): Adds a few points of Keen, which will be covered later when we get to combat.
Large-Scale: Covered above.  Bigger and heavier weapon, more damage, more Error Range.
Lure: Gives a bonus to Feint Checks.
Massive: Make it good for sending enemies flying, but requires high Strength.
Ogre: Craftsmanship that increases weight but forces morale checks.  How?  I do not know.
Orc: Craftsmanship that makes any weapon always do Lethal Damage and causes Stress Damage even on a miss.
Pech: Craftsmanship that gives the Cheap Shot Trick.
Poisonous (blunt and hurled only): All Edged weapons already have this, but now you can add it to other weapons so that you can add poison to them.
Reliable: Removes Unreliable.  A must for a firearm user.
Rootwalker: A craftsmanship that makes any weapon always do Subdual Damage.
Saurian: A craftsmanship that makes the weapon easier to hold and removes penalties for fighting underwater.
Small-Scale: Mentioned before.  Smaller weapon, less damage, lower cost, bigger Error Range.
Superior: Mode damage and durability.
Trip (blunt and edged only): Gives a bonus to Trip Actions.
Unborn: The weapon folds up, retracts, or somehow otherwise gets smaller when not in use.

And that is it for Gear.  I know I glossed over a lot, but there is not much to say about most of it.  Next time though, we get to have a nice long talk about Reputation and what it can be used for.

 23 
 on: August 01, 2014, 07:33:47 AM 
Started by spinningdice - Last post by Mister Andersen

Action Dice: 3
"I can still replace him," Janus says after the ranger is gone. "Catch him up, take him off the trail, devour him..."

 24 
 on: August 01, 2014, 06:32:04 AM 
Started by spinningdice - Last post by Antilles
Aiden decides to play good cop to Creamor`s bad cop. He waves the engine over to the table, orders a pair of beers and warmly shakes his hand. "Thank you so much for aiding us, the thought of going into the savage north unprepared isn`t very appealing. Here, have a beer, it`s the least I can do."

The next hour is spent pouring over the map, discussing potiential routes, shelters, dangers, where to go to get a good overview of the landscape, good watering holes and hunting grounds. In short, about everything that could come in handy on such an expedition. During the talks Aiden makes sure to keep the ranger`s cup filled and the occasional joke and friendly anecdote.
Unfortunately, the ranger is in no mood for for such things, barely participating enough to not be considered impolite, answering Aiden's questions curtly and to the point, and when Aiden runs out of questions the ranger mumbles something about early patrols tomorrow and quickly makes his exit.

(click to show/hide)

 25 
 on: August 01, 2014, 06:17:35 AM 
Started by Mister Andersen - Last post by Mister Andersen
Thought some folk might find this interesting.



1: Don't run it like D&D, there is no real "Challenge rating."

That doesn't mean send players on runs that will brutalize them because "realistically" the opposition will be super tough, because Johnson isn't going to send runners on shit they likely will fail. Untested teams generally get scoped out with milkruns. On the same note, don't have the cops be retards who stand face to face with a clearly drugged up, augmented troll. They are going to run like hell, call for backup, use cover, and use thermal smoke to block line of sight. Likewise, they are not omniscient. If the players are not obviously there don't have em rush them. For examle, in a firefight you don't snipe the decker sitting on the ground in the other room just because you have LOS, because they probably arn't looking at him. If a player pops smoke or suddenly moves to the second floor, let them have their ambush, it makes shadowrun more interesting. Likewise, don't ask for sneaking rolls unless someone specifically thinks someone may be there and is listening for trouble or if they are in someone's face. Even a giant troll can go unnoticed if he is walking down a totally empty hallway during a low alert, this isn't D&D where everyone apparently sings while they walk if they botch a sneak check. Real life is noisy.


2: Don't fall into the trap of making runs super complicated.

Corps don't blow their entire operating budget on security. They won't have 50 turrets in the building. They will have ONE turret in the building, between where the wageslaves work and the high security areas. Don't just think security, think practicality. Does a corp really want to give every single wageslave an FOF enabled badge? Is it worth a glitch accidently causing the thing to fire.


3: FOR THE LOVE OF GOD, DO NOT HAVE THE JOHNSON BETRAY THE RUNNERS UNTIL YOU ARE READY FOR THE RUNNERS TO NEVER USE A JOHNSON AGAIN.

If you betray the runners they will never trust again, which is game cancer.


4: Try to remember the setting is about runners making runs, suceeding, and getting away.

If you come up with an idea on why they couldn't do this, it has already been handwaved away. At the most basic level, the mark almost never tries to go after the runners unless they make themselves a target. Sure, a rapid response team member may have been shot, and they damaged some propery, but the subsidiary branch is already in hot water with HQ for letting them get through and sure as hell won't get away with calling in even MORE money to get petty revenge that in no way will help them. They know the runner passed off the info or target. Anything destroyed or assassinated is gone. Revenge is just more red numbers in the ledger. The only exception is if the runners do something stupid, like hold onto something VALUABLE (Taking a few handguns or some electronics from a supply closet is ok, holding onto a prototype laser is dumb) because if the corp suspects it was a grab mission they will be searching for the goods. If they plug the security guard (READ: Not a member of a rapid response team) while he was napping in front of donuts the wageslaves who bought him said donuts will be said if no one looks for the murderers.


5: Don't enforce weight limits, but make sure the movement of gear is an issue.

Always ask what the runners have on their person when the run starts, and what they do with other gear they take. Take a page from Payday 2, it makes the run more fun if they need to figure out how to smuggle a giant drill in to bust a vault open.


6: Remember in 5e, the hacker is mostly going to be interacting with meatspace rather than "Hack targets" and almost every common item in the world is wireless.

So if the hacker asks "What can I hack" you should respond with "Anything." Be liberal with what they can do, as hackers are a bit meh right now if they operate purely in cyberspace.


7: Allow the runs to sometimes be easy.

Honestly a run should be a single session and you want to encourage your players to be a bit clever. If they come up with something genuinely smart then the run should be genuinely easy.


8: Remember the Johnson will hire runners who can complete the mission.

They overtly DONT want the runners to be challenged. If the team would have a nightmare of a time facing down cyber-security then the Johnson would never hire them on a run to steal data from a server unless they knew the runners could just steal the server itself.


9: Leave minor details of the world that could serve as plot threads around.

If a player takes an interest in ANYTHING and decides to poke into it further, make it a thing. Even if it was never going to be a thing in the first place, turn it into something big they can take advantage of. It helps you out a ton if the players are so invested in the world they actively create runs for you.


10: Always make sure the run has an angle.

The Johnson isn't looking to fuck the runners, but he is fucking someone. Part way through the campaign, after everyone is comfortable, throw a run with a big unforeseen affect on the world. Team hacks a mainframe and leaves a back door? Have it be a big deal a week later that during a stock crash on the server they hacked allowed Lofwyr to buy out a huge chunk of Atzy manufacturing, and now Atzy runs are super dangerous because their forces are much more angry and concentrated. They kidnap a dude? Turns out to be a researcher who makes some insane implant for security folk. This is the wakeup call for the runners to start being political, and has the same *WHAM* factor a Johnson betrayal does without having the absolutely terrible effects on your game that an actual backstabbing does. After this point the runners start wanting to cause change and that is fantastic.


MORE THINGS

To be fair, you shouldn't be setting out encounters and combat situations for your PCs, this isn't DnD. You should be creating a realistic situation for what they're doing (eg. infiltrating a gang hideout? Place will be packed of gangers. Getting into a corporate building at crack of dawn? Maybe a security team of 5-10). It's the PC's decision whether to go mirrorshades and avoid them, or to go pink mohawk and take them out, considering their situation, task and the number of enemies. There's always the option to run from a firefight too, so it's really they're fault if they get stuck into things and die for going full gung-ho when they can't hack it.

You're not making a combat encounter for them; they're finding people in the world who happen to be willing and capable of fighting back if the PCs start things. How well they fight back isn't level-scaled or shit like that; it's just what they come across.

Ain't no level appropriate encounters here. Some places will have combat as simply out of the question. Other places will be easy to knock over.

 26 
 on: August 01, 2014, 12:25:30 AM 
Started by Mister Andersen - Last post by Mister Andersen
Fraking Marvel.

There were 5 founding Avengers: Tony Stark, Thor, Bruce Banner (Hulk), Hank Pym, and Janet van Dyne, the one who named the team. Cap wasn't one of them; he didn't show up until issue 4... after being discovered as a Capsicle by Janet.

Of those 5 founding members, we have Tony Stark with 5 movies including 3 solos, Thor & Hulk each with 4 movies including 2 solos, and now Hank Pym with 1 movie. Of those 5 founding members, guess which one is not only getting a film, but won't ever be getting a film because she's getting fridged (quite probably offscreen) to increase Hank Pym's manpain.

Not only that, but Scott Lang's daughter Cassie -- the whole reason Lang became Ant-Man in the first place and who would later go on to become a member of Young Avengers -- appears to have been arbitrarily renamed and made into Pym's daughter.

While I'm aware that Jan might be lost in the microverse as a result of the accident, having already stripped out all but one of the women who were founding members of the iteration of the team that the Guardians of the Galaxy is based on I'm not particularly confident

 27 
 on: July 31, 2014, 11:19:02 PM 
Started by Kadrok - Last post by Kadrok
So... I have issues with both proposed rules.
It's the same set of rules as my OP, I'm merely adding how I would handle "pre-snapped" and "snapped" Elantrians.

Quote
In the first, you have to study Aons one by one. It's like Snapping into a new Misting for each Aon.
Precisely. You need to invest in learning each individual Aon....
Quote
And no single Aon is as versatile as most of the metals, so it's a ton of AP you'd spend to be very marginalized.
True. But Aon Dor as a whole is more versatile than Allomancy, and Allomancy is a lot more instinctual, whereas Aon Dor requires study. It would be expensive, but I think you underestimate the power you'd have. And expensive->power is a winning formula for me.

Quote
In this more recent one, you give someone a Rating 3 in "Every Other Aon". There are at least hundreds of known Aons. Being able to use literally any of them at Rating 3 is preposterous. There is literally no situation where you don't have some power that would help you.
Preposterous is a bit harsh, and I think you're grossly overestimating your chances of success at rolling 3 dice. With the base rating you have a little over a 1/3 chance of actually pulling off whatever you're trying to do with an Aon you're pulling out of your... shiny silvery behind. And that's against a difficulty 1! It becomes much harder against an actual challenge. If that is not hard enough for you, have the Elantrian base rating be 2, with 3 in the specialized Aons... like I said, the numbers were just so I could explain the concept. Regardless, this seems like a very strong argument for exactly the system I am proposing: having them individually graded.

Quote
I propose a compromise. AonDor is simply a single power, with a single rating. This Rating represents a general familiarity with AonDor, and provides two benefits.

First, it's the number of Aons you personally know well enough off the top of your head to write perfectly... So, for someone with a Power Rating in AonDor of 3, this means they've studied the art of AonDor itself to a certain extent, and in addition they have studied/practiced three specific Aons to the point that casting them in a stressful situation off the top of their head is possible. If you're someone like Raoden, who had studied Aons even as a mortal and has practiced them obsessively since, your rating is prolly something like 9, and thus you have a wide variety of Aons to potentially choose from.

Secondly, the number would indicate your Skill whenever you use an Aon. So if you have a Rating of 3, you can know three Aons, and any time you used any of those three, your rating would be 3.

Stunts would allow you to add modifiers to any of the Aons you know, and Props would allow you to carry additional Aons around with you to copy out then and there; probably something that would be impossible under some circumstances (like most combats) but a way to grant you a bunch of Utility Aons that can assist you beyond your core group; you'd use them with your basic AonDor rating. It's thematically a reflection of Raoden copying out Shao for his illusions.
I'd be lying if I said I thought this was a terrible idea, it's not. There is much to like about it... it neatly controls the amount of powers available to the Elantrian, and streamlines their level up somewhat, as well as providing the game with a useful prop for Elantrians. I certainly wouldn't call it a compromise, it's a completely different system.

I do have a couple of issues:

1) it makes it very easy to max out Aon Dor. Say I start at rating 3... I only have to spend 7 long breathers and 42 AP to pretty much be as good at Aon Dor as I can be. I pick 10 Aons and then I'm set, and I'm as good with the last Aon I learned as I am at the first. This seems to create exactly the kind of "preposterous" situation you're concerned with... it'd be like have 10 metals at 10, all for the low low cost of 60AP. Not only that, but it is inconsistent with the slow burn and disparate development of Feruchemy and Mistborn.

2) it diminishes individuality. Because of the universal Aon rating, you're as good at Aon Ehe as you are at Tia if you know them both. Not only is this not accurate to the books (I would argue) but it's boring because it promotes homogeneity. Two Elantrians who've raised Aon Dor up to 9 will have considerable overlap in their abilities. Neither of them is a better healer than the other if they've both taken Ien as one of their Aons. This is mitigated somewhat by the stunts, but given the stunts are thus far all universal modifiers, it wouldn't take that long to become the same shapeless Elantrian blob as the other Elantrians in the party. Having to work on the Aon's individually forces the Elantrians to specialize. Do I want to get better at healing, or am I going to need to create light or teleport? Having the powers separately rated opens up the same world of permutations and distinctions already available to Mistborn and Feruchemists.

 28 
 on: July 31, 2014, 10:49:46 PM 
Started by Kadrok - Last post by Outis
So... I have issues with both proposed rules.

In the first, you have to study Aons one by one. It's like Snapping into a new Misting for each Aon. And no single Aon is as versatile as most of the metals, so it's a ton of AP you'd spend to be very marginalized.

In this more recent one, you give someone a Rating 3 in "Every Other Aon". There are at least hundreds of known Aons. Being able to use literally any of them at Rating 3 is preposterous. There is literally no situation where you don't have some power that would help you.

I propose a compromise. AonDor is simply a single power, with a single rating. This Rating represents a general familiarity with AonDor, and provides two benefits.

First, it's the number of Aons you personally know well enough off the top of your head to write perfectly. Remember that knowing the Aon for Ehe isn't as simple as knowing the word "Fire". Imagine if the word "Fire" were a lot less forgiving. fire doesn't count, nor does FIRE. Imagine if there was a single, stylized, highly unique way of spelling "Fire" in cursive, and you had to write it perfectly, by hand, to get the magic effect. It's not even a combination of letters like in English; the "r" in Fire and the "r" in Power, in this example, look completely different. Once the base Aon Aon is drawn, the rest is as unique as it is specific.

So, for someone with a Power Rating in AonDor of 3, this means they've studied the art of AonDor itself to a certain extent, and in addition they have studied/practiced three specific Aons to the point that casting them in a stressful situation off the top of their head is possible. If you're someone like Raoden, who had studied Aons even as a mortal and has practiced them obsessively since, your rating is prolly something like 9, and thus you have a wide variety of Aons to potentially choose from.

Secondly, the number would indicate your Skill whenever you use an Aon. So if you have a Rating of 3, you can know three Aons, and any time you used any of those three, your rating would be 3.

Stunts would allow you to add modifiers to any of the Aons you know, and Props would allow you to carry additional Aons around with you to copy out then and there; probably something that would be impossible under some circumstances (like most combats) but a way to grant you a bunch of Utility Aons that can assist you beyond your core group; you'd use them with your basic AonDor rating. It's thematically a reflection of Raoden copying out Shao for his illusions.

 29 
 on: July 31, 2014, 10:40:41 PM 
Started by Kadrok - Last post by Kadrok
Someone asked me what I meant by the 'Infinite Penalty.' Given that most of you aren't in my head, to my knowledge, it was foolish of me to name that thing, without really explaining what I meant.

Basically, what I am calling the 'Infinite Penalty' is the inability of a newly snapped Mistborn to ever get "All other metals" to 4 like a pre-snapped Mistborn has, because of the limited knowledge of metals and the potential for godmetals of other shards. I talk about it a lot here:

http://www.crafty-games.com/forum/index.php?topic=7527.0

and here under "The NPCs Cheat" section:

http://www.crafty-games.com/forum/index.php?topic=7765.0

 30 
 on: July 31, 2014, 09:25:22 PM 
Started by Kadrok - Last post by Kurkistan_
Your modifications seem sensible enough.  Cool

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