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Off-Topic / Re: XCOM (Reactions, stories, let's play setups, etc...)
« Last post by RusVal on March 24, 2017, 11:57:17 PM »
Julian Gollop answered some questions about Phoenix Point recently on reddit.

Some interesting things to check out there.  Like how there will be 3 basic classes, and 5 specialist classes, with the ability to cross-class soldiers.  AP is also back, but the UI borrows a lot from the new two-point look.  Oh, and soldiers will stop if they spot something, letting you react and change their actions.
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Ten Thousand Bullets / Re: Pinging the Crafty Lads
« Last post by RichardAshenden on March 24, 2017, 01:39:54 PM »
Let's keep it real. We've been strung along for what amounts to likely a decade for a title which, in all probability, will never be released. My patience with this "publishing firm" has been taxed to the utmost, and, the proprietors have my resignation as a consumer. I will take my hard-earned dollars elsewhere.
Peace out.
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Mistborn Adventure Game / Re: Stormy Weather: Callout for suggestions
« Last post by Herowannabe on March 24, 2017, 07:52:13 AM »
Indeed! That is incredibly helpful and insightful! Thanks SirJerric!  :D
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Gotta love player paranoia  >:D
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Fantasy Craft / Re: Talking about Spellbound/FC magic in general.
« Last post by Saizhan on March 24, 2017, 05:15:45 AM »
Back to OP. I would like to see rules for ritual magic and circle magic. I want to see an archbishop leading a bunch of priests in prayer in a cathedral at high noon or a dozen infernalists performing bloody sacrifices under the black moon. My current system for this is a frankenstein's monster cobbled together from 3 different rulesets... There's a lot of arbitrariness involved. I would love to have a more streamlined system to work with.
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Fantasy Craft / Re: Talking about Spellbound/FC magic in general.
« Last post by MilitiaJim on March 23, 2017, 07:15:23 PM »
  To be fair, the SRD and its grimoire were more of a tabletop RPG cultural touchstone when Spellbound was conceived over ten years ago. :)

Annnnddddddd now everyone feels old.
I've got half-busted joints aplenty to make me feel that, Spellbound just makes me feel wise and sh-beep.  Which is somewhat odd.
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Mistborn Adventure Game / Re: Stormy Weather: Callout for suggestions
« Last post by Viperion on March 23, 2017, 06:01:25 PM »
That, sir, is an incredibly helpful and useful post. Huzzah for you sir! Huzzah!
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Mistborn Adventure Game / Re: Stormy Weather: Callout for suggestions
« Last post by SirJerric on March 23, 2017, 05:23:45 PM »
I am far from an expert on sailing ships, but as I understand the situation, most storm-driven damage is due to conflicts between wind speed and water speed (the ship speed tends to be between the two, so canvas and wood get shredded by an aerodynamic grist mill) or due to pounding from large waves breaking over the ship. Making landfall in that situation is extremely hazardous, since you are trading flowing water for solid matter. Water will attempt to move with you; the beach won't. Beaches also magnify the breaking of waves, so that won't help either. Also consider that the ship moves with the storm, so you can't expect to make landfall on the leeward shore. Landing on the windward shore equates to a high-velocity encounter.

The general practice is to "reef the sails" (bundle them tightly so they aren't adding extra speed in undesirable directions), tie down anything that is actually loose (rare on a well-managed ship) and steer into the teeth of the storm (This to allow the prow to cut into the waves, but depending on the design of the ship, is not always the preferred technique. Nobody wants to be hit broadside though, so avoid that.).

Your outline suggests that the storm comes on fast, and that the sails may not be fully reefed. Failure to reef the sails quickly will prevent the tiller from turning the craft into the wind, so the two operations are intertwined (losing control like this is called broaching). Desperate crews may choose to cut the sails off the mast (yardarms? something else?), and I have heard of situations in which the mast itself (maybe the rigging too) creates enough drag that it can break even without the sails. Even if things don't break, rolling the ship stem over stern is a possibility if the waves are steep and the sails are giving the wind enough leverage.
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Fantasy Craft / Re: Talking about Spellbound/FC magic in general.
« Last post by TheOpSecTreeFloof on March 23, 2017, 05:01:24 PM »
  To be fair, the SRD and its grimoire were more of a tabletop RPG cultural touchstone when Spellbound was conceived over ten years ago. :)

Annnnddddddd now everyone feels old.
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Off-Topic / Re: Augment-less: The Next Stage of Cyberpunk?
« Last post by Equinox on March 23, 2017, 04:49:27 PM »
But as real-life prosthetics advance, and our tolerance for people who are different increases (stochastically, at least), and people discover they don't want to hide their artificial limbs but instead show them off and turn them into art (shout out to Aimee Mullins), cyberware fades into the background because it becomes more normal. Sure, we might bypass a functional need for mechanical prostheses if we can learn to clone-grow a new arm (though I imagine the attachment to the nervous system would still involve some electronic magic), but if on the other hand we can build an electropolymer-based robot arm that runs on blood sugar and provides useful strength, agility and sensation to the user, I can totally see people going "Eh, meat is boring, I'm going chrome".
Micro-surgery advancements are astonishingly good, allowing surgeons to attach nerves to nerves these days. One of the sticking points is that nerves tend to degrade fairly easily and there regeneration is slow-to-nonexistent, but if they ever overcome that problem (through genetic modification, for example) then you'll see limb regrowth much faster.

Personally, I would anticipate something like Spiderman's Lizard or animal hybrids before you get into bio-mechanics.

Having said that, I'm also looking at the I-Phone and the move to make electronic devices integral to the human experience, and I think you'll also see something like implanted electronics along the lines of the eye-devices you see in Black Mirror, or chip implants that function much like I-watches. The key is that if we go in the bio-mechanic direction, it will be integrated so as to be almost invisible, or blended into what already exists (e.g. a visible but stylish tattoo).

In keeping with what's already been said, I suspect the genre shift is a reflection of this changing paradigm.
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