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 1 
 on: October 22, 2014, 09:47:53 PM 
Started by Mister Andersen - Last post by Mister Andersen
Goodbye AOS ratings boost.

That said, looks like we might be getting a glimpse of the Red Room

 2 
 on: October 22, 2014, 09:17:26 PM 
Started by Mister Andersen - Last post by foproy
so it seems that the age of ultron trailer droped six days early. and marvel blames hydra.

 3 
 on: October 22, 2014, 08:49:15 PM 
Started by Mister Andersen - Last post by Mister Andersen
Gargoyles, Young Justice, The Clone Wars, and the entirity of the DCAU for a start argue otherwise.

And there was no confusion in the early years: the first ep clearly established each gate uses the same 38 destination glyphs, and that a single gate could dial all other gates, as a result there's a single universal address for Earth that the rest of the galaxy had essentially forgotten following the revolution that closed the gate.

That said, I actually prefer the interconnecting network model, as well as each gate having unique glyphs because every planet has it's own unique constellations to form addresses for. It basically allows for trade routes and quest hubs, and as the basis for a RPG campaign setting that's exactly how I'd go with it.

I understand exactly why SG1 grossly simplified the way it works -- it just isn't feasible to continually send teams to worlds they have an absolutely minimal guarantee of being able to dial home from (having 2-way wormholes would admittedly make that less of an issue). And dramatically you just don't have the time in a 42 minute episode to have the team constantly trying to find the return address.

That said, universal addresses still works with the idea of interconnecting networks as the basis of a weekly action show, because once you start hitting mytharc episodes, discovering new routes and capturing/holding key hubs becomes important and feasible plot and continuity points.


 4 
 on: October 22, 2014, 08:31:04 PM 
Started by RusVal - Last post by Valentina
RE: point 1.
I've had a similar thought process on occasion, and my reaction to a few hours of UFO Defense was outraged disbelief.
I was affronted that anyone would think that at the sight of what's otherwise a mediocre rubber-mask-monster would be enough to drive "trained" soldiers into paroxysms of terror so great as to make fatricide the probable outcome.
Or in other words: "are you fucking kidding me?!"

Humans have been murdering themselves and everything else they could with sharp sticks for as long as history existed to be recorded and the idea that anything in the X:UD setting would be so traumatizing by nature is personally outrageous beyond conception.
Really, stop and think about it: if a given grunt, who's never heard Carl Sagan theorize about how any civilization that could travel at the speed of light likely has technology we can't possibly counter, can be convinced that in fact an apparent "alien" is actually some mutant species of hairless ground sloth that some other asshole gave a microwave radiation weapon to (or better yet, just fucking tell him "don't get shot by that gun, whateverthefuckitis, Private") I don't he'll hesitate overmuch to just kill the fucking thing.
Butt tight against shoulder, rear sight, front sight, squeeze trigger -dead fucking X.

This is too much Cthulu culture spunk -ZOMG IT SO DIFFERENT I GO MAAAAAD!!111

Fuck that.

Humans kill whales, and whales are alien looking. We kill cute and fuzzy things like otters. We kill malevolent and hungry things like alligators. We discover we are hosts to billions of strange and unsettling looking bacteria -and then we kill them with soap.
We can internalize the need to destroy anything with enough prompting -with not much at required if we find the thing threatening or appetizing.

Consider Aliens and Angels -could you tell one from another?
Seriously. Take a sec.
I can grant that if you saw an Angel (a modern human one) you might mentally take a step back because of the associated celestial fireworks. Maybe it's got a halo, maybe it has an aura of divine awe, maybe it has wings it doesn't apparently use to fly, maybe everyone you can see around you also hears it's voice in your head without it apparently speaking.

But without any blatantly supernatural effects if you saw one of those rings-within-rings-covered-in-eyes creatures from the Torah you'd probably question your sanity. And if it pulled a flaming sword and started carving through people in a Walmart parking lot you'd probably run for your fucking life.
At that point what it is is entirely entirely unimportant compared to what it's doing, and if there is ever a time I'd want to have a "right to openly bear arms" rally nearby it'd be to have a hundred long guns discharging in that thing's direction.

So apologies for any blasphemy, but to me what's borderline blasphemous is the idea that anything is so just "impossibly weird" that it could forestall a clear need for reactive violence.

No, what aliens I'd truly be concerned with would be ones like Asari or Eldar -things we'd want to bone, or at least sit around and chat with.
Those things could rearrange human life in truly permanent fashions potentially far worse then "mere" threat of death.

 5 
 on: October 22, 2014, 06:40:16 PM 
Started by Mister Andersen - Last post by RusVal
http://s8.org/gargoyles/askgreg/search.php?qid=17076

Quote
The Animated Stargate: The Hunted should make use of what animation does best. We should open up the scope of what we're creating. It's as easy (and cost-effective) to paint a truly otherworldly background, as it is to draw one that looks like it could be found somewhere near Vancouver. So we want weird environments: underground cities, water worlds, cloud deserts or whatever. It's also as easy to design a truly alien alien as it is to draw one whose look could be achieved by a human wearing great make-up. We want inhuman aliens (although not so weird that they're unrelatable to our audience, unless that's the point of a specific story). Similarly, new alien technology should be shocking and stunning
.

There are some interesting -- and truly terrible -- ideas within, but the entire basis of the series seems to fly directly in the face of how SG-1 -- the version of the franchise upon which the series would have been based -- established the structure of the gate network

The irregularities with SG-1 canon can probably be attributed to the still evolving universe that was the first few seasons of the show.

That said, the major hurdle that I can see for a show like this is the fact that it would be Western Animation.  I'll admit that I haven't been entirely on top of the current available shows, but I can almost guarantee that it'll be one of two types: kid-friendly or excessively "adult".  No middle ground, which I think is where a setting like Stargate is best, around the area that the live-action show was at.

 6 
 on: October 22, 2014, 05:26:40 PM 
Started by RusVal - Last post by RusVal
So I'm going for a walk, and my mind happens to wander towards XCOM.  Yeah, yeah, big surprise, but stay with me.  As I'm walking along, I'm thinking about how EU/EW is different to UFO Defense, a subject which many people have already covered, mainly in the range of "they dumbed it down for stupid console people" to "hey, I don't have to feel like I'm filling out a business spreadsheet with a nuclear sub's controls".  However, as I pondered the game mechanics of both, and how they interacted with each other in their own environments, a pair of very interesting thoughts came to me:

1.) UFO Defense is a Redshirt Simulator.  EU/EW is Third-Person Shooter Commander
There you are, ordering a small horde of "highly" trained, "well" equipped soldiers in partially organized clumps around the map, vainly hoping that you would be able to spot the aliens before they spotted you.  The aliens would then be stumble on to one at a time, at which point the soldiers would wildly fire in the general direction of the target.  If the soldiers' bad aim, the poor sighting of their equipment, and the general ineffectiveness of their bullets don't get in the way, the alien goes down.  If they do, the alien then likely kills a couple of the poor sods just to show how dangerous the threat really is.
Sound familiar?
One of the things that I always found interesting about the original UFO Defense when I first started watching let's plays of it was just how much it felt like you were playing the hapless military force sent to contain the latest alien monster on X-Files, particularly in the beginning sections.  Even when XCOM's equipment starts to improve, it isn't so much in the way that they become ubersoldiers come to save the day, and more elite mook versions that are meant not to fall at the first punch, but are still likely to get wiped out at a moment's notice.  In fact, one could say that they only become truly effective when they "fool the narrative" into thinking that XCOM are good-guy aliens.  "Oh yeah, we're aliens all right.  See?  We got plasma weapons, psionic powers... we even got weird eyes, with one bigger than the other!  Humans couldn't possibly have all that, surely not..."

EU/EW, on the other hand, as Yahtzee points out in his review, is a game dedicated to all those commanding officers in all those modern cover-based third person shooter games, like Gears of War and Rainbow Six/Ghost Recon.  Up to four Co-op players, later with an additional two AI squadmates, move their big burly soldiers, with big burly guns, clad in big burly armor, cover to cover as they tactically position themselves to line up the perfect shot on the vast rogues gallery of Standard Sci-Fi Shooter Enemies.  As they progress, they level up with an RPG light system, and over the course of collecting collectible collectibles unlock even better versions of gear they already have.  The main difference is that you are all of those players at once, with the added benefit of being the one who determines the missions that you actually go on.
And compared to UFO Defense's tech progression, where you go from modern soldier redshirt, to star trek redshirt, to redshirt disguising themselves as aliens, EU/EW's progression goes from Call of Duty soldier, to near-future soldier/space marine light, to full on space marine.

2.)EU/EW Reconstructs UFO Defense's Deconstruction
To quote the TVTropes page:
Quote
[XCOM in general is a] Deconstruction of children's cartoon series such as G.I. Joe and Transformers. X-COM is a team of elite soldiers who wear cool-looking armor and have a fancy Cool Ship that they travel the world in to save the world from goofy-looking aliens... and then suffer a relentlessly high fatality rate, crippling technological inferiority, and severe funding troubles. Anyone Can Die, often in rather brutal ways, and 50% or higher casualty rates are common in successful missions, with failures usually resulting in no survivors whatsoever. The cool-looking armor is good for little else besides appearance. The Cool Ship costs ludicrous amount of money to lease and is completely unarmed. The goofy-looking aliens outnumber us over a thousand to one and have technology that outstrips ours to such a degree that X-COM might as well be fighting them with sticks. The Man in Washington will happily cut funding at the drop of a hat, even if there's a UFO landing outside the White House. It is not a very pleasant situation.

A rather accurate assessment, when you think about it.  The thing is, if you look at EU/EW, it is actually a reconstruction of that very thing.
X-COM is a team of elite soldiers who wear cool-looking armor and have a fancy Cool Ship that they travel the world in to save the world from goofy-looking aliens.  However, even though the risk of death is ever present, to the point where you can have 50% casualties or higher, unlike UFO Defense where the only counter is to send as many people as possible to increase the chances of someone surviving, EU/EW's can be countered via smart tactics, proper skill usage, a cool head, and a little bit of luck.  The cool-looking armor is actually useful this time around, and can actively save a soldier's life to the point of preventing downtime via injury.  The Cool Ship still costs money, but you only have to worry about the one, and it is impossible to actually lose it.  You also get to see the Cool Ship in flight, so that's a bonus (Wooooosh! Grin ).  Sure, the aliens outnumber us, with technology that is leaps ahead of ours, but we have the ability to adapt, both in physical growth and in technological know-how, with even our less experienced soldiers and weaker weapons still being useful in a pinch.
And even the man in Washington, the very council of vague shadow baldness, is remarkably understanding of our difficult situation, and is constantly giving us encouragement, even if we are not doing as well as we could be, to the point where they have to be in complete full blown panic to pull out of the project.
It is not a pleasant situation to be sure, but there is much more hope in EU/EW, which is further reinforced when you bring in the Genetically-enhanced supersoldiers and the large robot suit with the rocket fist.  It might be a hard fight, but with courage, smarts, and a little bit of elbow grease, we can, and will, overcome.

Just something to chew on.  I need to take walks more often.

 7 
 on: October 22, 2014, 11:30:22 AM 
Started by Mister Andersen - Last post by Mister Andersen
http://s8.org/gargoyles/askgreg/search.php?qid=17076

Quote
The Animated Stargate: The Hunted should make use of what animation does best. We should open up the scope of what we're creating. It's as easy (and cost-effective) to paint a truly otherworldly background, as it is to draw one that looks like it could be found somewhere near Vancouver. So we want weird environments: underground cities, water worlds, cloud deserts or whatever. It's also as easy to design a truly alien alien as it is to draw one whose look could be achieved by a human wearing great make-up. We want inhuman aliens (although not so weird that they're unrelatable to our audience, unless that's the point of a specific story). Similarly, new alien technology should be shocking and stunning
.

There are some interesting -- and truly terrible -- ideas within, but the entire basis of the series seems to fly directly in the face of how SG-1 -- the version of the franchise upon which the series would have been based -- established the structure of the gate network

 8 
 on: October 22, 2014, 10:09:23 AM 
Started by Mister Andersen - Last post by Soulcatcher
Lovely Little Thieves, a horror visual novel.  They have a demo, link at the KS page.

 9 
 on: October 22, 2014, 10:01:30 AM 
Started by Morgenstern - Last post by MilitiaJim
Any news on this front?
We have cider to go with the marshmallows.  (There is a campfire, there must be marshmallows.)

 10 
 on: October 22, 2014, 09:58:41 AM 
Started by Morgenstern - Last post by Gatac
Any news on this front?

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